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The Solaris Installation Experience

Michael Larabel

Published on 26 June 2007
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 3 of 4 - 3 Comments

After selecting your time zone in Solaris Express, the date and time is displayed with the ability to adjust these values.

The next step in the process is to enter and confirm the root password. There isn't much room for innovation here other than possibly a "password strength" meter.

After entering an alphanumeric root password, the Sun Microsystems License Agreement is displayed and must be agreed to before proceeding. With Fedora, the license agreement was moved from Anaconda to the first-boot setup process for reasons with OEM installations.

The Solaris install options are almost completed, but first the software localizations must be selected. This software localizations page is similar to the time zone selection area, granted listed are locales instead of times. Additional language support can be configured in Fedora 7 when customizing the packages to be installed.

After selecting the localizations to install, the next step is to select the initial system locale to use. The default during our installation was English POSIX C.

Finally getting ready to install Solaris, the final area to tackle is for setting up the hard disks. Before creating, deleting, or customizing partitions you must first select the disks(s) where Solaris will be installed. After selecting the disk(s) there is then the different partitions and the ability to go with a default-partitioning layout.

With the Anaconda installer for Linux, the hard disk partitioning is one of the first steps in the install process. This is very beneficial earlier rather than later in the event your hard disk is not detected or you do not have enough space available on your hard drive. The Anaconda hard disk setup and advanced storage configuration is much easier for new end-users from our point of view.

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