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The Solaris Installation Experience

Michael Larabel

Published on 26 June 2007
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 2 of 4 - 3 Comments

After selecting the keyboard layout, in Solaris "Nevada" is the automatic discovering of additional network interfaces and then a message about the installation process. The user only has 30 seconds to answer the first question; otherwise, the installer will exit and enter a console installation. The installer will also enter console mode if the screen is blank or unreadable. In Fedora / the Anaconda Linux installer, you have as long as you want to answer any of the questions. The Anaconda installer also has its own network page during the installation process, which among other items lets you select whether to activate each network interface on boot, using IPv4 or IPv6, or configuring other network settings.

The first graphical window we see during the Solaris Express installation process is a window where the user needs to press ENTER if they see the window, for assuring the X server is properly configured.

The next screen in the interactive installation process is to select a language. In reality, the language selection should be at the very start of the install process prior to selecting the keyboard layout and the other prompts that had appeared. The Anaconda installer places the language selection at the beginning as well.

After selecting the language, you are finally presented with a semi-decent graphical interface for finishing out the installation process. For selecting the time zone you have a list of the different continents and oceans, and then a sub-menu of more specific areas within each of those different geographic locations. During JavaOne/CommunityOne 2007, Ian Murdock had explicitly mentioned this as a problem where Solaris users need to search through a list to find their location while Linux users have it much easier for finding their time zone and then can use NTP for synchronizing the time. In Fedora 7 you are presented with a map of the world and then can zoom into your location and select a nearby major city with a yellow dot. This path taken by Anaconda is much cleaner and easier to navigate.

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