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Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Razer DeathAdder Gaming Mouse

Michael Larabel

Published on 10 February 2007
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 3 of 3 - Comment On This Article

Performance:

While Razer has yet to open-source their drivers or provide official specifications, like past Razer mice the DeathAdder had functioned without fault as a mouse under Linux. However, the user then lacks the ability to change polling rates, profiles, and other options. RazerTool is a viable SourceForge project for adjusting these settings on the Copperhead, but its support does not appear to be completed yet for the DeathAdder. Using a SVN checkout of RazerTool, the DeathAdder had not yet worked. However, it should take minimal hacking to add the support to RazerTool.

We had tested the Razer DeathAdder out for a few weeks with Linux inside GNOME and running a variety of workstation/business programs as well as a few games. The mouse had operated fine without any complaints while running Enemy Territory and Quake 4 as well as when using OpenOffice, Thunderbird, and Firefox.

Conclusion:

While testing the Razer DeathAdder, the thought had occurred what we like better whether it would be the prestigious Copperhead or the new DeathAdder. The DeathAdder's design is larger and different in many respects from the Copperhead while it continues to improve upon Razer's mouse technology. We had actually liked the slight increase in the size and its overall ergonomics. After weeks of testing, the Razer DeathAdder is our new favorite and will be taking home the Phoronix Editor's Choice Award for its superior design and quality. This is also a competitively priced mouse at approximately $60 USD.


Phoronix Product Rating: 9 / 10

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
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