1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Razer Tarantula Gaming Keyboard

Michael Larabel

Published on 19 December 2006
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 2 of 3 - 3 Comments

Examination:

Rather than simply making a few minor changes to a conventional keyboard and selling it off as a new gaming keyboard, the Razer Tarantula was designed with new innovations from the ground up. This design is in sharp contrast to Metadot where they had taken a $15 KeyTronic OEM keyboard and painted the keys and then selling it as a $70 Gaming Das Keyboard. On the right hand side of the keyboard are ten programmable macro keys. Using Razer's software, the macro keys can execute up to a series of eight keystrokes. Razer's software also allows adding up to 200ms delays with the macro keys. At the top of the Tarantula is what Razer is calling a BattleDock. The BattleDock is a USB port that can be used for connecting to other Razer devices such as the Razer BattleLight or Razer BattleEye. Some of the other features for the Razer Tarantula keyboard include optimized Hyperesponse keys, anti-ghost capabilities, replaceable keys, on-the-fly program detection, and 32KB of onboard memory. The Tarantula also supports storing up to 100 profiles and an iridescent glow to enhance the look of this keyboard. The replaceable keys are to setup gaming keys for reference. Meanwhile, the objective of Hyperesponse is to provide ultra low latency response times. Razer Synapse powers the 32KB of onboard memory to store up to 100 customizable profiles.


At the top of the keyboard on the upper right hand side are two USB ports as well as a headphone and microphone audio jacks; thus connecting to the computer are two audio and two USB connections. These ports on the keyboard are handy but it is unfortunate that the Razer Tarantula will occupy two USB ports. When it comes to the keyboard itself, it is a full size keyboard with a wrist rest at the bottom of the keyboard -- it also has an illuminated Razer logo at the bottom. There are 104 standard keys and an additional 20 function keys. On the bottom of the keyboard are four non-skid feet.

Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. AMD Radeon R9 290: Gallium3D vs. Catalyst Drivers
  2. AMD Radeon R9 290 Open-Source Driver Works, But Has A Ways To Go
  3. Trying The Configurable 45 Watt TDP With AMD's A10-7800 / A6-7400K
  4. Sumo's Omni Gets Reloaded
Latest Linux Articles
  1. 20-Way Radeon Comparison With Open-Source Graphics For Steam On Linux Gaming
  2. Preview: OS X 10.10 Yosemite vs. Ubuntu Linux GPU Performance
  3. Radeon Graphics Yield Mixed Results With Linux 3.17 Kernel
  4. AMD's RadeonSI Driver Sped Up A Lot This Summer
Latest Linux News
  1. Nouveau On Oibaf PPA Is Back To Running Well
  2. Metro 2033 Redux Will Hopefully Hit Linux Real Soon
  3. New Virtual Monitor Software Might End Up On Linux
  4. Company of Heroes 2 Might Be Coming Out For Linux
  5. NIR Still Being Discussed For Mesa, LLVM Gets Brought Up Again
  6. Plasma Active Is Mostly Ported To KDE Frameworks 5
  7. Google Chrome 37 Brings Many Security Fixes
  8. MenuetOS Updated With SMP Threads & Onscreen Keyboard
  9. Mesa Has A New Release Manager
  10. Enlightenment E19 Lands Its New Wayland Compositor Code
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. Canonical Joined The Khronos Group To Help Mir/Wayland Drivers
  2. AMD Releases UVD Video Decode Support For R600 GPUs
  3. Announcing radeontop, a tool for viewing the GPU usage
  4. Updated and Optimized Ubuntu Free Graphics Drivers
  5. [DB] BIOS - ACPI - data collecting
  6. It's Now Possible To Play Netflix Natively On Linux Without Wine Plug-Ins
  7. Users defect to Linux as OpenBSD removes Lynx from base system
  8. Chinese People Try To Patent Wine On ARM