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Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

NVIDIA AYiR 2006

Michael Larabel

Published on 5 December 2006
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 3 of 7 - Comment On This Article

With Linux SLI being sub par, for testing this year's NVIDIA drivers we had used the GeForce 7800GTX. The GeForce 7800GTX has been supported under GNU/Linux since its launch in June of 2004. The drivers we had tested for our AYiR 2006 were 1.0-8756, 1.0-8762, 1.0-8774, 1.0-9626, 1.0-9629, and 1.0-9742. Below are the components we had used for testing.

Hardware Components
Processor: AMD Athlon 64 X2 4200+
Motherboard: Abit KN9 Ultra (MCP55 Ultra)
Memory: 2 x 1GB OCZ DDR2-1000
Graphics Card: NVIDIA GeForce 7800GTX 256MB
Hard Drives: Seagate 160GB SATA2 7200.9
Optical Drives: Lite-On 16x DVD-ROM
Cooling: OCZ Tempest
Case: SilverStone Crown CW01
Power Supply: SilverStone Zeus ST75ZF 750W
Software Components
Operating System: Fedora Core 6
Linux Kernel: 2.6.18-1.2849.fc6 SMP (i686)
GCC: 4.1.1
Graphics Driver: NVIDIA 1.0-8756
NVIDIA 1.0-8762
NVIDIA 1.0-8774
NVIDIA 1.0-9626
NVIDIA 1.0-9629
NVIDIA 1.0-9742
X.Org: 7.1.1

For maintaining compatibility with the older display drivers we had pulled out Fedora Core 5 Bordeaux. For benchmarking we had used Enemy Territory, Doom 3, Quake 4, and GLOBS. Enemy Territory was used due to its legacy status and long time adoption by Phoronix. RTCW: Enemy Territory was tested at varying resolutions. Meanwhile Doom 3 and Quake 4 were both used to represent current popular Linux-native games. Quake 4 is the most demanding Linux-native game to date, and will likely be until the release of Enemy Territory: Quake Wars in the middle of 2007. Doom 3 and Quake 4 were both benchmarked at varying resolutions and image quality levels. GLOBS (GL Open Benchmarking Suite) is a recent newcomer to Phoronix and has proved to be a reasonable open-source OpenGL benchmark for comparing drivers and hardware components. GL Open Benchmarking Suite was benchmarked with a resolution of 1280 x 1024.

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