1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking Benchmarking Platform
Phoromatic Test Orchestration

Abit AW9D i975X

Michael Larabel

Published on 10 November 2006
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 9 of 9 - Add A Comment

Conclusion:

Universal Abit is delivering the AW9D series a bit late to the game. The i975X Chipset has been floating around since late last year and early this year, while the AW9D was only introduced in August of this year. However, we had been discussing the AW9 series privately with Abit for nearly a year before its launch with much anticipation. The Abit AW9D and AW9D-MAX ship with support for Intel's Core 2 Duo as well as the recently introduced quad-core Core 2, along with all of the other enthusiast and overclocker-friendly features. The key differences between the AW9D and AW9D-MAX are an additional three Serial ATA 2.0 ports, one eSATA, two Gigabit NIC, and a dual heatpipe setup for Silent OTES on the MAX variant. The motherboard also supports ATI/AMD's CrossFire, and upon delivering supported drivers will support NVIDIA's Scalable Link Interface. When it came to the performance of the i975X-based AW9D compared to the i955X-based AW8-MAX, the results were very close though a majority of the time the AW9D had taken a minor lead. While this motherboard didn't deliver anything earth shattering or major innovations like the IC7-MAX3 had, the Abit AW9D is yet another highly competitive product. At the time of writing the AW9D is selling for approximately $200, which is fairly expensive for being the non-MAX variant. If price is not a major factor, the AW9D series is definitely worth considering for your next Intel upgrade.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
Latest Linux News
  1. KDE Marks Four Years In Its Process Of Porting To Wayland
  2. Btrfs In Linux 4.2 Brings Quota Updates, Many Fixes
  3. Latest Rumor Pegs Microsoft Wanting To Buy AMD
  4. The Next-Gen Phoronix Site Experience Is Almost Ready
  5. Exciting Features Merged So Far For The Linux 4.2 Kernel
  6. Mesa 10.6.1 Brings A Bug-Fix For Dota 2 Reborn
  7. DragonFlyBSD 4.2 Released: Brings Improved Graphics & New Compiler
  8. Wine-Staging 1.7.46 Improves The OS X Experience
  9. The State & Complications Of Porting The Unity Editor To Linux
  10. Libreboot Now Supports An AMD/ASUS Motherboard
Latest Articles & Reviews
  1. How KDE VDG Is Trying To Make Open-Source Software Beautiful
  2. Attempting To Try Out BCache On The Linux 4.1 Kernel
  3. CompuLab's Fitlet Is A Very Tiny, Fanless, Linux PC With AMD A10 Micro
  4. AMD A10-7870K Godavari: RadeonSI Gallium3D vs. Catalyst Linux Drivers
Most Viewed News This Week
  1. Kubuntu 15.10 Could Be The End Of The Road
  2. Linus Is Looking Forward To Merging KDBUS, But Not Convinced By Performance
  3. NVIDIA Starts Supplying Open-Source Hardware Reference Headers
  4. KDBUS Won't Be Pushed Until The Linux 4.3 Kernel
  5. Linux 4.2 Kernel Gets Port To New Processor Architecture
  6. The Staging Pull For Linux 4.2: "Big, Really Big"
  7. SteamOS "Brewmaster" Is Valve's New Debian 8.1 Based Version
  8. EXT4 Has Many Cleanups & Fixes For Linux 4.2