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NZXT Apollo

Michael Larabel

Published on 15 September 2006
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 3 - Comment On This Article

While NZXT's initial product from 2004 -- the Guardian -- is still being manufactured and is popular with a segment of gamers, they have been quick to expand this year with their product selection. This summer we had looked at the Lexa aluminum midtower and the Precise 650W PSU, and today we are delivering our thoughts on the NZXT Apollo steel midtower chassis. Other products to recently come out of NZXT are the Zero full-tower aluminum chassis and Sentry 1 fan controller. These products are on top of their Nemesis, Nemesis Elite, and Trinity chassis' that have been in the market for some time. The NZXT Apollo that we have to look at today is composed mostly of steel, screw-less design, and a magnetic closing door.

Features:

· Steel chassis
· See-through smoked acrylic for 5.25" LCD devices
· Screw-less design
· Standard dual 120mm silent fans
· Intel HD and ac 97 audio support for 7.1 and 5.1 audio systems
· Support for four internal hard drives
· Magnetic closing door
· USB 2.0 and Firewire support

Contents:

This is our fifth time reviewing an NZXT computer chassis, and throughout this time, their packaging techniques have remained largely the same -- as with most case manufacturers. The NZXT Apollo had arrived in a large cardboard box, which had displayed a picture of the chassis as well as listing the features and specifications. Inside we were left with the case, which was encased inside of a plastic bag while Styrofoam had ensured the case would not incur any damage. The Apollo is available in four colors -- silver, black, blue, and orange -- the sample we are looking at today was the blue model.

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