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OpenBenchmarking.org

Abit KN9 Ultra

Michael Larabel

Published on 14 August 2006
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 5 of 10 - Comment On This Article

Performance:

As for overclocking this motherboard, we were able to push an AMD Athlon 64 X2 4200+ up to 250MHz+ FSB speeds effortlessly. The tweaking options certainly were adequate, and while no records were broken, it should be good enough to satisfy the tastes of most overclockers. For comparison purposes, we had ran the Abit KN9 Ultra up against the ASUS M2N32-SLI Deluxe, which is powered by the NVIDIA nForce 590 SLI Chipset. Below is the run-down of components used during this performance showdown.

Hardware Components
Processor: AMD Athlon 64 X2 4200+
Motherboard: Abit KN9 Ultra (MCP55 Ultra)
ASUS M2N32-SLI Deluxe (590 SLI)
Memory: 2 x 1GB OCZ DDR2-800
Graphics Card: ATI Radeon X1800XT 256MB
Hard Drives: Western Digital 160GB SATA2
Optical Drives: Lite-On 16x DVD-ROM
Cooling: OCZ Tempest
Power Supply: Sytrin Nextherm PSU460 460W
Software Components
Operating System: Fedora Core 5
Linux Kernel: 2.6.17-1.2157_FC5 SMP (i686)
GCC: 4.1.1
Graphics Driver: ATI fglrx 8.27.10
X.Org: 7.0.0

In the past with Abit motherboards we have not experienced too much out of the ordinary when it comes to GNU/Linux compatibility problems. The only major item that has stuck out in our minds when it came to Abit and GNU/Linux was the lack of official uGuru support, which we will not have to worry about with this motherboard. Using a clean install of Fedora Core 5 we had run into no problems during the Anaconda installation or once inside of GNOME. All of the components on the motherboard were properly detected and we were set for benchmarking. Even LM_Sensors was able to detect the Winbond W83627EHG using the w83627ehf-isa-0290 module. The case fan, CPU fan, fan3, fan4, system temperature, CPU temperature, and temp3 probes were all properly detected and reported correct numbers. The only problem with this detection was the lack of Voltage monitoring. The Abit KN9 Ultra had worked fantastic with Fedora Core 5 Linux. The benchmarks used for comparing the KN9 Ultra and M2N32-SLI Deluxe WiFi was Enemy Territory, Doom 3, HDparm, Gzip Compression, LAME Compilation, LAME Encoding, FreeBench, and RAMspeed.

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