1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Enermax Marathon Enlobal Fan

Andros Lee

Published on 10 July 2006
Written by Andros Lee
Page 1 of 7 - Comment On This Article

For years now we have been accustomed to sleeve and ball bearing fans to cool our beloved computer components. However, Enermax is attempting to appeal to the quiet-minded enthusiasts by unleashing their own line of Enlobal bearing case fans. This new general design is used in fans from featuring auto restart, manual and automatic speed adjustment, and the Marathon (very long lasting fan). All of the fore mentioned fans are rated as silent fans and run anywhere from 17dB up to about 40dB while pushing up to 60CFM of air. The fan we will be looking at today is the Marathon version from Enermax that boasts the following rap sheet:

Features:

· Enlobal Bearing
· 17dB noise level
· 900~1100 RPM
· 44CFM Airflow
· Seven Blades
· Exclusive ENLOBAL bearing with magnetic-barometric design to run friction-free and noiseless
· Nano-technology composite for lowest abrasion and extreme durability
· Detachable fan blades can be cleaned

Contents:

In the past Enermax has sold cases, power supplies, external enclosures, and a few nice keyboards, now they have decided to sell a 120mm fan. However, this is no ordinary fan; as usual, Enermax is selling their version of this common case fan with a different well thought through approach (in this specific case: longevity and silence). It only makes sense that they move into this market so they can sell you a majority of the parts you will need to house and operate a fully functioning computer (case, PSU, case fans) supported by well designed cooling and computer housing products.

While there are a plethora of fans in existence, a majority of the ultra-silent fans available are either not as powerful, or are louder than the Enermax fans. It would seem that the use of the Enlobal bearings might be the key element in reducing noise while being able to move air at such speeds. Included with the Enermax Marathon fan was the 120mm fan itself, mounting screws, and a 3-pin fan to 4-pin molex adapter. For review purposes today we had two Enermax Marathon Enlobal Magnetic Barometric Bearing Fans (UC-12EB).

Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. A Walkthrough Of The New 32 System Open-Source Linux Benchmarking Test Farm
  2. Habey MITX-6771: Mini-ITX Board With Quad-Core J1900 Bay Trail
  3. OCZ Vector 150 SSD On Linux
  4. Noctua i4 CPU Cooler: Great For Cooling High-End LGA-2011v3 CPUs
Latest Linux Articles
  1. AMD Kaveri: Open-Source Radeon Gallium3D vs. Catalyst 14.12 Omega Driver
  2. 12-Way AMD Catalyst 14.12 vs. NVIDIA 346 Series Linux GPU Comparison
  3. AMD Catalyst 14.12 Omega Driver Brings Mixed Results For Linux Users
  4. 6-Way Winter 2014 Linux Distribution Comparison
Latest Linux News
  1. Intel Skylake Audio Support For Linux 3.19
  2. After 10+ Years, NetworkManager Reaches v1.0
  3. VDPAU Updated To v0.9
  4. An Open Hardware Random Number Generator Proposed
  5. LLVM 3.6 Will Be Branched Next Month
  6. Opera Browser Puts Out Linux Updates For The Holidays
  7. GNOME Shell 3.15.3 Adds Support For High-Contrast Themes
  8. Linux 3.19: ThinkPad Muting Redone, New Dell Backlight Support, Acer Is Banging
  9. KVM Drops Support For IA64 While Adding Various x86 Improvements
  10. GCC 4.8.4 Officially Released
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. XLennart: A Game For Systemd Haters With Nothing Better To Do
  2. Need some hand holding with upgrading xserver
  3. Debian init discussion in Phoenix Wright format
  4. The New SuperTuxKart Looks Better, But Can Cause GPU/Driver Problems
  5. FPS capped on Linux (AMD fglrx drivers)
  6. Are there an app using HSA ?
  7. Bench specific mount point
  8. Tool for measuring FPS in games