1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking Benchmarking Platform
Phoromatic Test Orchestration

Enermax Marathon Enlobal Fan

Andros Lee

Published on 10 July 2006
Written by Andros Lee
Page 1 of 7 - Add A Comment

For years now we have been accustomed to sleeve and ball bearing fans to cool our beloved computer components. However, Enermax is attempting to appeal to the quiet-minded enthusiasts by unleashing their own line of Enlobal bearing case fans. This new general design is used in fans from featuring auto restart, manual and automatic speed adjustment, and the Marathon (very long lasting fan). All of the fore mentioned fans are rated as silent fans and run anywhere from 17dB up to about 40dB while pushing up to 60CFM of air. The fan we will be looking at today is the Marathon version from Enermax that boasts the following rap sheet:

Features:

· Enlobal Bearing
· 17dB noise level
· 900~1100 RPM
· 44CFM Airflow
· Seven Blades
· Exclusive ENLOBAL bearing with magnetic-barometric design to run friction-free and noiseless
· Nano-technology composite for lowest abrasion and extreme durability
· Detachable fan blades can be cleaned

Contents:

In the past Enermax has sold cases, power supplies, external enclosures, and a few nice keyboards, now they have decided to sell a 120mm fan. However, this is no ordinary fan; as usual, Enermax is selling their version of this common case fan with a different well thought through approach (in this specific case: longevity and silence). It only makes sense that they move into this market so they can sell you a majority of the parts you will need to house and operate a fully functioning computer (case, PSU, case fans) supported by well designed cooling and computer housing products.

While there are a plethora of fans in existence, a majority of the ultra-silent fans available are either not as powerful, or are louder than the Enermax fans. It would seem that the use of the Enlobal bearings might be the key element in reducing noise while being able to move air at such speeds. Included with the Enermax Marathon fan was the 120mm fan itself, mounting screws, and a 3-pin fan to 4-pin molex adapter. For review purposes today we had two Enermax Marathon Enlobal Magnetic Barometric Bearing Fans (UC-12EB).

Latest Linux News
  1. Trying To Run The Intel Core i7 5775C On Linux
  2. VirtualBox 5.0 RC3 Brings VMM Fixes, Takes Care Of Some KDE DnD Problems
  3. Ubuntu Is Finally Fixing Its Annoying GRUB Setting
  4. Firefox 39.0 Brings New Features, HTML5 Changes
  5. OPNsense 15.7 Released As Fork Of Pfsense
  6. The Less-Powerful Intel Compute Stick With Ubuntu Will Soon Ship
  7. Kodi 15.0 Release Candidate 1 Arrives
  8. Fedora 23: Python 3 Default Approved; Netizen Spin Rejected
  9. GNOME Shell & Mutter Just Landed More Wayland Improvements
  10. Ubuntu MATE Announces A Partnership With A PC Hardware Vendor
Latest Articles & Reviews
  1. 6-Way File-System Comparison On The Linux 4.1 Kernel
  2. How KDE VDG Is Trying To Make Open-Source Software Beautiful
  3. Attempting To Try Out BCache On The Linux 4.1 Kernel
  4. CompuLab's Fitlet Is A Very Tiny, Fanless, Linux PC With AMD A10 Micro
Most Viewed News This Week
  1. Kubuntu 15.10 Could Be The End Of The Road
  2. Pinos Is For Linux Video What PulseAudio Is For Audio
  3. KDBUS Won't Be Pushed Until The Linux 4.3 Kernel
  4. The State & Complications Of Porting The Unity Editor To Linux
  5. The Staging Pull For Linux 4.2: "Big, Really Big"
  6. Latest Rumor Pegs Microsoft Wanting To Buy AMD
  7. "PulseVideo" Coming To Complement PulseAudio?
  8. Exciting Features Merged So Far For The Linux 4.2 Kernel