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SilverStone Zeus ST75ZF 750W

Michael Larabel

Published on 7 May 2006
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 2 of 5 - Comment On This Article

Examination:

With the 750W PSU needing to pack in extra power components to make this product possible, the ST75ZF measures in at 40mm deeper than the previously reviewed SilverStone ST56F -- the total dimensions of the 750W PSU are 150 x 86 x 180 mm. This deeper power supply should not cause much of a problem with most standard ATX case setups; however, those that have a shorter PSU mounting area or any unique assembly mechanism may find the installation to be a challenge. Some of the potentially problematic chassis' are the Antec Performance One P180 and Antec Studio Take 4 -- both of which use a unique PSU cooling chamber to segregate the airflow. Outside of the PSU being larger than normal, the Zeus ST75ZF looks almost like any other SilverStone power supply unit with a black exterior. The cooling needs for the power supply are certainly surprising, as only a single 80mm fan is used.

At the rear of the power supply is the on/off switch, power connector, and a red power LED. As there is no fan at this end of the PSU, the end is covered in a great deal of holes for allowing the warm air to escape -- similar to a mesh screen. Through these holes, the innards of the power supply can be seen. Inside are rather large aluminum heatsinks to assist in the heat dissipation. With no 120mm intake fan on the bottom, or any other items on the alternate sides, the PSU does remain quite bare with its black facade. However, a sticker does contain some SilverStone information in regards to the 750W PSU. At the opposite end of the Zeus ST75ZF is the single 80mm ball bearing fan and strand of cables.

Not counting the optional power adapters included with the unit, the ST75ZF offers a 24/20-pin motherboard, 8-pin ATX12V, 6-pin AUX, two 6-pin PCI-E, seven 4-pin molex, four Serial ATA, and two 4-pin PDD connectors. All of these cables were more than adequate in length to reach the various components. The only power cables that were sleeved were the PCI Express, motherboard, and auxiliary cables. Other features for this unit include 72A and 720W combined on the +12V quad rails, greater than 80% power efficiency, 2.9 kg weight, and 24dBA minimum noise level.

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