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Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking Benchmarking Platform
Phoromatic Test Orchestration

ECS PF5 Extreme

Michael Larabel

Published on 24 February 2006
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 3 of 11 - Add A Comment

Next up, is the Northbridge, which is the Intel 945P. The 82945P MCH largely provides support for DDR2, PCI Express x16 graphics, and Intel Celeron D/Pentium 4/Pentium D processors. Atop the 945P is an aluminum heatsink with fan, and a similar mounting method like the Southbridge heatsink. This Northbridge cooler is quite tall, yet it should not interfere with a majority of retail CPU heatsinks and water blocks. To the left of the Northbridge are two 3-pin CPU fan headers for use with the Northbridge heatsink as well as the 40mm fan located near the I/O panel. Also in this area is the 4-pin ATX power connection. Moving onto the CPU socket, the area around it is relatively clear of any possible obstructions when mounting cooling devices. Outside of the CPU socket area is the 4-pin CPU fan header with support for PWM. At the rear of the motherboard is a plastic shroud to help in pushing air away from the CPU socket area, a portion of the capacitors, and PWM controller. Ever since the days of the Abit IC7-MAX3 (i875P), cooling contraptions for the power circuitry on motherboards have been dramatically increasing with numerous manufacturers. Although the PF5 Extreme Cooling Accelerator is not nearly as decorated as the IC7-MAX3 OTES (Outside Thermal Exhaust System), or similar designs from other manufacturers, it certainly will be able to assist in cooling one the warmer areas of the system. Pushing the air with the ECS Cooling Accelerator is a small 40mm fan.


The I/O ports available on the rear of the ECS PF5 Extreme are two PS/2 (keyboard & mouse), four USB 2.0, two RJ-45 (10/100 & 10/100/1000), one 4-pin IEEE-1394a, one SPDIF in, one serial COM, and six additional audio ports. In addition, there is a duct area in the place of a printer port, to allow the hot air from the Cooling Accelerator to escape from the system. Flipping over the motherboard, the opposite side of the motherboard is bare of any "overclocking strips" and likewise technologies that some motherboards have begun implementing on the backside of the PCB.

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