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Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Logitech MX518/MX1000

Michael Larabel

Published on 30 January 2006
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 3 of 3 - Comment On This Article

Performance:

As we face with all of the major peripheral manufacturers that design mouse products for enthusiasts and gamers, their proprietary mouse control software is not supported by Linux. Logitech's software for both the MX1000 and MX518 are presently available for Microsoft Windows, and the MX518 has official compliancy with Macintosh OS X+. However, with a bit of tweaking we managed to get both mice operating accordingly under Linux. In addition, for using some Logitech-specific features under Linux comes a reliable GNU GPL program for configuration. The latest of the open-source programs to offer support with Logitech's MX series is lomoco, which is designed for Logitech mouse control. Lomoco is based upon lmctl, which was a project designed for Linux USB Logitech mice control with altering vendor-specific options. At the time of writing, lomoco offers official support in its code base for the Wheel Mouse Optical, MouseMan Traveler, MouseMan Dual Optical, MX510, MX518, MX300, MX310, MX500, iFeel Mouse, G5 Laser, MX900, Cordless Freedom Optical, Cordless Elite Duo, MX700, Optical TrackMan, Cordless Presenter, diNovo Media Desktop, and MX1000 Laser. Luckily, both the MX518 and MX1000 are presently supported by this version of lomoco, while on their public TODO list is to append additional support for the G5 and G7 mice as well as the MX900. Some of the features presently implemented with the text-based lomoco are wireless status reporting, resolution changing, and SmartScroll/Cruise Control. Lomoco is largely developed by our friends at Linux Gamers, and at their site, they also host various how-to guides for Logitech users who have experienced problems getting all of their mice buttons to work and other MX challenges faced under Linux. For our testing, we had tested both mice on a Fedora Core 4 system using the 2.6.14 kernel, and with both the MX518 and MX1000, they had operated with lomoco as well as all of the mice buttons once properly configuring the options related to X.Org. For comparison purposes, we had also used the Razer Copperhead mouse. With each of the mice, we had experimented with Quake 4, America's Army, and Unreal Tournament 2004. We had also done various general usage tasks within GNOME.

Conclusion:

Certainly, one of the items that most users will have to acquaint themselves with to proficiently using both mice is the increased sensitivity thanks to the high-end optical engine on the MX518 and laser engine used on the MX1000. For those that are already using a high sensitivity mouse should have no troubles getting used to either of the mice. As far as the exterior design goes, both mice are well laid out with their button position as well as the ergonomically designed product to match the right hand. The appearances of both mice are also stunning. Unlike years ago where cordless mouse were plagued with horrible interference and latency issues, with the RF-based MX1000 we had experienced no troubles pertaining to the wireless capabilities. As far as the mouse battery goes, it uses a Lithium-Ion battery, which is definitely a step-up from the previous Nickel Metal Hydride rechargeable battery with the Logitech MX700. With the MX1000 mouse, we faced absolutely no problems with a short battery life, or long recharge times, and the battery indicator was certainly a lifesaver. For Linux users, even though the G5 and G7 are now Logitech's flagship products, there remains much more literature and open-source programs available on the Internet pertaining to the Logitech MX series and its vendor-specific features. Both the MX518 and MX1000 should have no problems satisfying nearly all right hand users from the casual home user to professional PC gamers. Of course, it may be wise to simply try out either of the mice before rushing out to go purchasing one, as when it comes to mice they can often be subjective upon personal preference with the sensitivity, weight, buttons, and overall effect. Presently the Logitech MX1000 is selling for a rather high $79.95 USD while the MX518 can be purchased for $49.99.


Phoronix Product Rating: 8 / 10

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
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