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Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Logitech MX518/MX1000

Michael Larabel

Published on 30 January 2006
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 2 of 3 - Comment On This Article

Examination:

Starting our examination with the Logitech MX1000 unit, we began with the actual mouse. Unlike some mice that simply receive improvements to the inside workings of the mouse, and then the manufacturer refer to it as a new model, the Logitech MX1000 shipped with an improved design. One of the functional improvements to the exterior design is the implementation of a LED battery indicator for displaying the real-time charge of the mouse. To the battery indicator are four distinct levels from fully charged, to almost empty. Inside of the MX1000 is a Lithium-Ion battery, unlike the new G7, the battery is not swappable. The MX1000 battery charges simply by properly setting the mouse upon its docking station. As for the longevity of the battery, it should be able to last quite a few days before needing to be recharged, depending upon usage. The charging process should only take a couple of hours. Onto some of the button features, rather than the traditional up and down wheel scrolling, the MX1000 allows the wheel to also be tilted left and right. Of course, on the left and right sides of the scroll wheel are the two traditional buttons. One of the possible design flaws with the MX1000 design is that its not ambidextrous, rendering the device almost inoperable if you prefer to game with your left hand. Right hand users, however, should find the Logitech MX1000 to be incredibly comfortable. Rather than using an optical engine, the MX1000 uses a laser engine, with an infrared beam. Also on the bottom is an on/off switch, for completely turning off the mouse when it will not be used for extended periods and would like to conserve energy, as well as a sync button for re-synchronizing the wireless signal with the docking base station. Also on the underside of the mouse, the Teflon feet have improved beyond earlier MX products.

The MX1000 docking station has a USB interface; however, using the adapter can be connected to the computer with a PS/2 interface if desired. In addition, the AC adapter also needs to be connected to the docking station when charging the mouse. Unlike some mice that have turned to Bluetooth Wireless, the MX1000 continues to use an RF receiver.

Moving onto the Logitech MX518, it largely prides itself upon the 1600DPI tracking and in game sensitivity switching. Like the previously reviewed Razer Copperhead, the MX518 can easily switch its DPI tracking. Fortunately, unlike the Copperhead, the DPI switch is not located on the bottom of the mouse so it should be much easier to switch values when in the middle of a gaming firefight. The three values consist of 1600, 800, and 400 DPI. Another change with the MX518 mouse is its paint finish, which is unique to say the least. Rather than simply coloring the mouse a solid color, the MX518 paint effect looks as if there are dents and various bumps over its exterior. The MX518 also prides itself on a superior grasp and sculpted thumb support. Unlike the MX1000, the mouse scroll wheel is only capable of scrolling up and down, and no left and right capabilities. As far as the button placement goes, it has the fairly common layout for past MX optical products. With the MX518 not offering any wireless capabilities or other uncanny features, the bottom of the mouse remains bare with the exception of the high-quality feet and red optical tracking.

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