1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

ASUS EAX1300PRO Preview

Michael Larabel

Published on 27 January 2006
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 2 of 2 - Comment On This Article

The ASUS EAX1300PRO part runs at ATI's reference RV515 specifications for the PRO variant of a 600MHz core speed and 800MHz with the memory. However, Microsoft users are able to utilize the HyperDrive software from ASUS to overclock the graphics card in one of three ways with dynamic overclocking abilities. Of course, at the time of writing the ATI Linux fglrx drivers do not support the X1000 series, let alone Rovclock, which is the lone ATI overclocking program presently available for Linux. However, if ATI Linux overclocking abilities are granted, the ASUS EAX1300PRO/TD/256M/A should have no cooling problems boasting a moderate overclock. Cooling the GPU core is a small copper heatsink. The heatsink features a small fan in the corner as well as vertical copper fins to further improve the cooling process. In our tests, the six-blade fan has proven to be quite powerful and the heatsink as a whole had done a respectable job at cooling the GPU. Although the heatsink appears to cover a portion of the memory modules, the base does not actually come in contact with the ICs. The heatsink is attached to the graphics card through four bolts going into the red PCB. Filling up the remaining space on the ASUS graphics card is additional circuitry as well as the 2-pin fan header.


At the rear of the graphics card is a single DVI and analog D-Sub VGA interface, as well as an S-Video Out. The X1300PRO also supports ATI's Avivo Technology, which should greatly assist in mainly media PCs with H.264 decode acceleration and other related video tasks. On the opposite side of the PCB, the plastic heatsink retention frame with four screws can be found, as well as two part stickers. The memory chips used on the ASUS EAX1300PRO are Infineon HYB18T256161AF-25 and come from a batch of 0538. These eight, four on each side of the PCB, 2.5ns part are rated for an 800MHz (2 x 400MHz) operating frequency and have a combined capacity of 256MB.


Overall, on paper this appears to be another respectable ATI Radeon budget part; however, we will have to hold off on drawing any conclusions until we are able to properly benchmark the graphics card under Linux. At this time, the ASUS Extreme AX1300PRO 256MB part is presently selling for approximately $110 USD. How long until the X1000 series will be supported by ATI's proprietary fglrx drivers? Well, earlier this morning we had spoken with Matthew Tippett from ATI's Linux department for a public comment and he has simply said that the supportive drivers are indeed coming and they will be out eventually, and he also said it will likely not be for a couple of releases at least. With the department's present strategy of releasing monthly Linux drivers as of late, these drivers will likely not be in the hands of the public until sometime this spring, unless of course a miracle was to occur with their development process. However, for those that have already picked up an ATI Radeon X1000 solution for a Linux box, using X.Org v6.8.2 we had no troubles running the EAX1300PRO with the VESA drivers. Of course, using the VESA drivers will inhibit the frame-rate and image quality, along with lacking 3D support, and various other desktop features. When attempting to install ATI's latest v8.21.7 drivers, the display would fail to initialize upon restarting X.Org. Listing the PCI devices, the ASUS EAX1300PRO was displayed as 01:00.0 VGA compatible controller: ATI Technologies Inc: Unknown device 7142 and 01:00.1 Display controller: ATI Technologies Inc: Unknown device 7162. Unfortunately, we are not able to make any other comments at this time in regards to Linux and the X1000 series, however, upon the release of supportive ATI drivers, we will be delivering the ASUS X1300PRO results as well as from various other X1000 parts, and will draw our final remarks in regards to this ASUSTeK product at that time.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
Latest Articles & Reviews
  1. Samsung 850 EVO SSD Linux Benchmarks
  2. Kubuntu 15.04 Is Turning Out Quite Nice, Good Way To Try Out The Latest KDE
  3. 5-Way Linux Distribution Comparison On The Core i3 NUC
  4. OCZ ARC 100 Linux SSD Benchmarks
  5. Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Works Great As A Linux Ultrabook
  6. Transcend SSD370 256GB
Latest Linux News
  1. AMD Will Release Mantle Programming Guide, API Reference This Month
  2. Unreal Engine Made Free By Epic Games
  3. Qt 5.5 Alpha Is Getting Close, But Still Behind Schedule
  4. OpenBSD Sponsors Work For Better Browser Security
  5. Improved ODF Reading Support Comes To KDE's Calligra
  6. Another Step Closer On The New Linux Benchmarking Test Farm
  7. Confirmed: Vulkan Is The Next-Gen Graphics API
  8. Kdenlive Ported To Qt5/KF5, Coming To KDE Applications 15.04
  9. HTC & Valve Partnered Up For The Steam VR Headset
  10. 8cc: A Small C11 Compiler
Most Viewed News This Week
  1. Screenshots Of The GNOME 3.16 Changes
  2. More Proof That Allwinner Is Violating The GPL
  3. The Tremendous Features Of Fedora 22
  4. Krita 2.9 Released, Their Biggest Release Ever
  5. A Single UEFI Executable With The Linux Kernel, Initrd & Command Line
  6. Linux 4.0 Doesn't Have The Weirdest Codename
  7. Canonical Comes Up With Its Own FUSE Filesystem For Linux Containers
  8. Firefox 36 Brings Full HTTP/2 Support
%%CLICK_URL_UNESC%%