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PC Partner RC410MS7-A82C

Michael Larabel

Published on 13 January 2006
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 3 of 9 - Comment On This Article

BIOS:

Booting up the PC Partner RC410MS7-A82C we were greeted by a Phoenix Award Workstation BIOS. The BIOS closely resembled the default template, and had not appended any pages like Abit with their uGuru implementation. The main BIOS pages are standard CMOS features, advanced BIOS features, advanced Chipset features, integrated peripherals, power management setup, PnP/PCI configurations, PC health status, and frequency/voltage controls. On the advanced Chipset page, the current FSB and DRAM frequencies were displayed as well as the ability to specify the DDR2 frequency. The memory frequencies listed were DDR-200, DDR-266, DDR-333, DDR-400, DDR-533, and DDR-667. Other negotiable items included UMA frame buffer size, adjust DRAM timing, adjust PCIE configuration, video display devices, and TV standard. From the PCI Express configuration page, there were options to add 10% extra current and graphics overclocking and graphics link width. From the PC health status page, there are configurable items of a case opened warning, CPU fan speed control, and shutdown temperature. The sensors displayed voltages for +1.8V, CPU, +3.3V, +5V, +12V, Chipset, and battery. The only temperature displayed from the PC health status area was the CPU temperature and the fan speed monitoring was on the CPU and system fan headers. Moving onto frequency/voltage control, the PCI clock can be automatically detected as well as enabling/disabling spread spectrum. The CPU clock is adjustable from 200MHz to a maximum of 255MHz, which may disappoint some but should be fine considering the inability to adjust the CPU voltages on the PC Partner motherboard. Chipset voltages available are 1.25V, 1.30V, and 1.35V while the DDR option is simply 1.8V and 1.9V.





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