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GeIL 2 x 512MB Ultra PC2-5300 DDR2-667

Michael Larabel

Published on 21 November 2005
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 7 - Comment On This Article

Over this past year, large advancements have been made when it comes to gaming and utilizing 2GB of system memory over the common 1GB capacity. Corsair now offers TWIN2X2048 2 x 1024MB matched memory kits while OCZ has begun to offer 2GB kits for their popular memory series, and this memory trend continues onto other memory manufacturers. Expanding your system memory to 2GB is becoming more and more prevalent with Microsoft gamers due to the latest titles such as Fear, Battlefield 2, and Call of Duty 2 being able to better handle the additional memory. Even with this mad rush to upgrade your DDR/DDR2 memory capacity to 2048MB, manufacturers are continuing to produce 2 x 512MB kits and enthusiasts are continuing to go after these products. The 1GB package we have with us today are from the folks at Golden Emperor International Ltd, or better known as GeIL. GeIL's Ultra PC2-5300 DDR2-667 modules come aggressively timed at 3-4-4-8 and claim to handle up to 2.4V. Below are GeIL's official specifications for the modules we have in front of us today.

Features:

· Available in 1GB to 2GB Dual Channel Kit
· PC5400 667MHz CAS 3-4-4-8
· 64x8 DDR2 FBGA Chips
· 240pin, Non-ECC, Un-buffered DDR2 SDRAM DIMM
· Aluminum Heat-spreader
· 6 Layers Ultra Low Noises Shielded PCB
· Retail Package
· Lifetime Warranty
· 1.8V - 2.4V Power Consumption

Contents:

When it comes to packaging this dual channel kit, GeIL is unlike the status quo with their cardboard and foam construction, compared against the all-plastic packaging from some of the other popular memory providers. The actual cardboard container is generic to all of GeIL's Ultra DDR2 dual channel kits while the only identification of the modules are on the rear with two stickers showing the memory is a 2 x 512MB pair and the speed is PC-5300 667MHz. Opening up the container, a foam pallet had slid out and resting on this were the two GeIL DDR2 modules complete with heatspreaders. No instructions or any other documentation was provided with the memory modules, but if you are so inclined available on the GeIL website is an overclocking manual along with some other information under their support section.

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