1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking Benchmarking Platform
Phoromatic Test Orchestration

Antec Smart Power 2.0 500W

David Lin

Published on 24 August 2005
Written by David Lin
Page 3 of 3 - Comment On This Article

Performance:

To test the Smart Power, we used the following Venice nForce4 system:

Hardware Components
Processor: AMD Athlon 64 3000+ (Venice) @ 2.7GHz on 1.64V
Motherboard: DFI Ultra-D
Memory: 2 x 512MB PQI Turbo TCCD
Graphics Card: eVGA 6800GT
Hard Drives: Maxtor 120GB and 160GB
Add-On Devices: Chaintech AV-710
Cooling: AquaXtreme 50z, Dual heatcore with 2x120mm fans, Dangerden TDX
Software Components
Operating System: FedoraCore4
Linux Kernel: 2.6.12-1.1398

We tested the power supply with a load by using CPUBurn v1.00 Linux for 30 minutes. A Craftsman digital multimeter was used to monitor the rail voltages for load and idle. Overall the performance of this unit was acceptable. The 3.3V rail was a bit low at 3.28 load and 3.29 idle, but it didn't seem to affect stability. The 12V rail was the most unstable however. While idle it stayed at a rather high 12.17V Once we subjected it to load, it immediately jumped down to 12.08V. A jump of .09V may not seem like much but it is definitely not desirable. Other than that however, the 5V rail was pretty stable.

 
+3.33
+5.00
+12.00
Idle:
3.29
5.02
12.17
Load:
3.28
5.06
12.08
 
Volts

Conclusion:

The cables are nicely sleeved and the modular features of this power supply make cable management much easier. The only problems we foresee with the modular features are that there are only four slots for cables. As mentioned before this limits the user's options, as only four of the six cables can be used at any given time. Overall this is not a bad power supply, but we wouldn't recommend it for overclockers or enthusiasts running SLI. The rails all dropped and fluctuated under load so it can affect stability. As for everyday use on a stock system, this power supply should be adequate. As always thanks to Antec for providing this unit for review.

Latest Articles & Reviews
  1. Ubuntu 15.04 Offers Faster OpenGL For AMD Radeon GPUs On Open-Source
  2. Ubuntu 15.04 Brings Some Graphics Performance Improvements For Intel Haswell
  3. Sub-$20 802.11n USB WiFi Adapter That's Linux Friendly
  4. The Lenovo T450s Is Working Beautifully With Linux
  5. Linux 4.0 SSD EXT4 / Btrfs / XFS / F2FS Benchmarks
  6. Linux 4.0 Hard Drive Comparison With Six File-Systems
Latest Linux News
  1. Linux 4.1-rc1 Kernel Released, Packs In Several New Features
  2. It Doesn't Look Like KDBUS Will Make It For Linux 4.1
  3. Debian 9.0 Is Codenamed Stretch
  4. AMD Radeon GPUs With Linux 4.0 + Mesa 10.6-devel
  5. The Many Features Of The Linux 4.1 Kernel
  6. HTTPS For Phoronix.com
  7. Gallium3D's HUD Gets New Customization Options
  8. Intel Xeon E5-2620 v3 Haswell Performance
  9. Dell Keyboard Backlight Support In Linux 4.1
  10. With Linux 4.1 You Can Play With The Chrome OS Lightbar
Most Viewed News This Week
  1. AMD Releases New "AMDGPU" Linux Kernel Driver & Mesa Support
  2. Ubuntu's Desktop-Next Switching From .DEBs To Snappy
  3. Systemd Kills Off Shutdownd
  4. My Favorite Computer Desk Of The Past Decade For Less Than $100
  5. AMD Open-Sources "Addrlib" From Catalyst
  6. Library Operating System (LibOS) For Linux Still Being Pursued
  7. Debian 8.0 Jessie Is Ready For Release This Weekend
  8. GIMP's Porting To GTK3 Continues