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Hiper Clavier Aluminum Keyboard

David Lin

Published on 17 August 2005
Written by David Lin
Page 2 of 3 - Add A Comment

Examination:

The packaging of this keyboard was nothing special, but there is a bit to say about the keyboard itself. Firstly it’s very solidly built, and very sturdy. Some keyboards, like Logitech's, may feel flimsy and light, but this is definitely not the case with the Hiper Aluminum keyboard. In fact, this is probably one of the best-built keyboards we’ve seen. The front frame of the keyboard is constructed from brushed aluminum. It’s very strong and does not bend or flex at all. The base of the keyboard is not made of aluminum, but of high quality plastic. The keys are also made of plastic and painted with metallic silver paint. Hiper also added an extra eight keys for multimedia controls. There is one for launching the Internet, one for e-mail, two for volume control, and four for moving controlling multimedia software. To the right of the multimedia keys they proudly display the Hiper name and logo. There are also three LED’s for indicating caps lock, num lock, and scroll lock. The keyboard layout is a bit different from standard keyboards. In fact it’s a laptop styled keyboard instead of a standard sized keyboard. The main changes are that the right shift key has been shortened by one block and the arrow keys have been fitted in. The ‘0’ key has on the keypad has also been shortened to make room for the arrow keys. This keyboard includes all the keys that you would find on a normal keyboard; the difference is they are packed together more efficiently, making for a smaller footprint. The other thing about this keyboard is that it’s very thin. The thickness is a mere 1.8 cm. Since it’s so flat on the table, it’s a lot easier to keep the wrist straight when typing (which is what you’re supposed to do). Even if your arms are rested flat on the table, the keyboard is not much higher. This means your wrists do not have to bend at an awkward angle and there’s a much smaller risk of injury.


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