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Thermaltake Tenor HTPC

David Lin

Published on 13 July 2005
Written by David Lin
Page 1 of 4 - Comment On This Article

People have been building their own home theater systems for decades now. The appeal of theater quality sound and video have persuaded many to spend hundreds and even thousands on DVD players, CD players, receivers, amplifiers, speakers, etc... How does the HTPC (Home Theatre PC) fit into the picture? Well, the HTPC is able to integrate many of these components and produce very high quality results at a fraction of the cost. HTPC’s can be used as a progressive scan DVD player, MP3 jukebox, photo viewer, etc... The HTPC can replace all of these components and produce equal or even better results. For example, the quality of progressive DVD player software is superior to the quality of hardware progressive players. They can also be tweaked and tuned such that the CD players sound like their hundred dollar counterparts. HTPC performance nowadays is very impressive, but few manufacturers are actually offering pre-built HTPC systems. The best option for users at this moment is to build their own custom HTPC machine. When it comes to building a system that is going to be placed in your living room and acts the centerpiece and driving force of your home theater, frankly, it has to look good. This however is no problem, since case manufacturers like Silverstone, Antec, and Thermaltake are happy to oblige. Today we have one of Thermaltake’s HTPC case offerings for review, the Thermaltake Tenor (VB2000SNS).

Features:

· Model Tenor: VB2000SNS
· Case Type: Desktop
· Net Weight: 8.5 Kg
· Dimension: 170 x 430 x 460 mm (H*W*D)
· Cooling System: Front (intake): 80 x 80 x 25 silent fan, 2000 rpm, 19dBA
· Rear (Exhaust): Dual 60 x 60 x 25 mm silent fan, 2500 rpm 19dBA
· Front accessible 3 x 5.25”, 2 x 3.5”
· Internal 3 x 3.5”
· Material Chassis: 1.0 mm SECC
· Front bezel: Aluminum
· Color Silver
· Expansion Slots 7
· Motherboards ATX, MicroATX
· Power Supply Standard ATX PSII
· Front Access Dual USB 2.0, IEEE 1384 Firewire, Audio & Speaker ports

Contents:

Inside the box we found the case, manual, and a cleaning cloth. The case itself was very well packed. The sides were protected by Styrofoam ends and the case itself was wrapped with a soft bag. The box itself was also very tough and so everything arrived in very good condition. As always, good job to Thermaltake with the packaging.

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