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NZXT Trinity Gaming Chassis

Michael Larabel

Published on 11 July 2005
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 3 of 5 - Comment On This Article

On the left side of the case is the acrylic window with the custom NZXT fan grill. In all four corners of the side window are strips of the metallic edging, which appears to be the same material that is found on the “black chrome” on the front of the unit. The included fan on the side panel contains blue LEDs, whereas the exhaust fan is on the rear of the chassis. Separating the custom fan grill from the actual fan is a perforated screen, which appears as if it will restrict the airflow marginally, but shouldn’t cause any a noticeable difference in performance.


On the rear of the chassis, the seven expansion slots can be found. Five of them were covered by the pop-out slot covers, while two covers were simply missing. Like the front intake fan, the exhaust fan supports 80, 92, and 120mm fans with a standard 80mm fan coming pre-installed.

Now with the exterior of the chassis covered, we opened up the side panel to get a better look at the interior. Although the external 5.25” drive bays are tool-less by using the included rails, there continues to be a limited amount of screw holes. These screw holes are still very welcome considering the troubles of installing some smaller peripherals into these bays using the tool-less rails; such as fan controllers and LED panels. Beneath the external 5.25” and 3.5” drive bays are the four internal 3.5” bays. The construction for the 3.5” cage is similar to what we have seen with the previously reviewed ATop Gladiator. On the top of the cage is a small clip and on the bottom side is a small thumbscrew. When the cage is removed, the front intake fan is accessible along with an 80/92 mm fan intake on the opposing side.


At the rear of the case, we see the exhaust fan, seven expansion slots, I/O shield, and PSU mount. All of these appeared to be rather normal. Removing the right side panel yielded very little room for routing any cables behind the motherboard-mounting tray.

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