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NZXT Trinity Gaming Chassis

Michael Larabel

Published on 11 July 2005
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 5 - Comment On This Article

Established in 2004, NZXT is considered a relative newcomer when it comes to computer chassis’ with other leading manufacturers being around for in excess of 10 years. However, Johnny H, the lead designer for NZXT, had dreams of creating outstanding computer chassis’ for gamers and he displayed his abilities quite well in his first case, the Guardian. A few months after the huge success of the Guardian, the Nemesis and Nemesis Elite were released, which brought a wealth of new and valuable features to computer chassis. Today, we have the pleasure of checking out NZXT’s fourth shot at delivering yet another chassis to gamers; this time it comes in way of the Trinity.

Features:

· Screwless installation for 5.25" and 3.5" Devices
· SECC steel construction
· Steel Plated front panel with black chrome finish
· Sleek, stealthed clear side panel (optional)
· Thermal display meter
· Custom NZXT fangrill
· Black/Silver reflective coated finish
· One 80mm blue LED fan (side)
· One 80mm fan (rear)
· Ext. Ports: 2 x USB 2.0, Mic and Headphone Jack

Contents:

The NZXT Trinity came packaged very well with a majority of the protection coming from Styrofoam. In addition to the Styrofoam, the chassis was encased in a plastic bag to prevent any scratches while on the front and side panel was a thin layer of a protective plastic film. All of the contents for the Trinity arrived in great condition, although the box didn’t weather too well due to being shipped back and forth twice due to some shipping mishaps that occurred during this year at Computex Taipei. Taking off the Trinity side panel we found a power cable, user’s manual, and a box containing various screws and accessories for mounting the computer components inside of the chassis. With our review sample, we didn’t receive the PSU but retail shoppers should receive a standard 400W ATX 12V power supply.

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