1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Ultra Products P4 Socket 775 CPU Cooler

Michael Larabel

Published on 2 July 2005
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 3 - Comment On This Article

The area above our processors has turned into some very competitive real estate with the overwhelming demand we all place on our CPUs in order to achieve a higher overclock. While air-cooling remains subordinate to water-cooling or phase changing solutions, performance wise, air-cooling continues to remain popular mainly due to the lower costs and easier setup. What we have in front of us in this review is the Ultra Products Copper Core CPU Cooling Fan for LGA775 processors. This heatsink utilizes a copper base and supports Intel P4 Prescott processors up to 3.8GHz.

Features:

· Socket Type 775
· Fan Speed: 3600 RPM
· Air Flow: 63.5 CFM
· Noise Level: 48.51 dBA
· Static Pressure: 6.21 mm/H2O
· Bearing Type: Sleeve
· Heatsink: Material Copper Core
· Aluminum Fins
· Fan Dimensions: 95 x 95 x 25 mm
· Heatsink Dimensions: 90 x 90 x 30 mm
· Voltage: 12 V
· Current: 0.5 A
· Power Consumption: 6 W
· Fan Speed Control: PWM Control
· Connector(s): 4-Pin Motheroard
· Life Hours: 40,000 Hours

Contents:

To our dismay, Ultra Products continues to use plastic packaging for the heatsink and its components. Unfortunately, with this type of packaging a pair of scissors or a knife is necessary to forcefully remove the contents. With Ultra Products packaging some of their memory modules in a wooden humidor-like container, its surprising Ultra Products hasn't derived a better alternative for packaging their heatsinks. Anyhow, contained inside of this clear plastic packaging were the actual heatsink and fan, installation manual, thermal paste, and the mounting plate. Unlike many CPU heatsinks on the market that offer near universal compatibility with all of the major CPU sockets, the Ultra Products heatsink we have in front of us today is only compatible with Intel LGA775 processors. The mounting plate is identical to what we found on the CoolJag JAC16EC and JAC84MC, where this plate attaches to the rear side of the motherboard via an adhesive backing, and then the heatsink attaches to this plate via the four LGA775 mounting holes. When unfolded, the Ultra Products installation manual is a mere page long and it shows pictures, in addition to the writing, on the proper mounting methods for the heatsink.

Latest Linux Hardware Reviews
  1. NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 Offers Great Linux Performance
  2. CompuLab Intense-PC2: An Excellent, Fanless, Mini PC Powered By Intel's i7 Haswell
  3. From The Atom 330 To Haswell ULT: Intel Linux Performance Benchmarks
  4. AMD Radeon R9 285 Tonga Performance On Linux
Latest Linux Articles
  1. 6-Way Ubuntu 14.10 Linux Desktop Benchmarks
  2. Ubuntu 14.10 XMir System Compositor Benchmarks
  3. Btrfs RAID HDD Testing On Ubuntu Linux 14.10
  4. Ubuntu 14.10 Linux 32-bit vs. 64-bit Performance
Latest Linux News
  1. Ubuntu 14.10 Officially Released
  2. Mesa 10.4 Might Re-Enable HyperZ For R600g/RadeonSI
  3. Intel GVT-g GPU Virtualization Moves Closer
  4. GTK+ 3.16 To Bring Several New Features
  5. Debian 8.0 Jessie Has Many Multimedia Improvements
  6. What Linux Benchmarks Would You Like To See Next?
  7. Open-Source, Linux Support For Corsair Link Devices Slowly Materializing
  8. Cairo-Dock 3.4 Shows A Lot Of Progress, Works Toward EGL/Wayland Support
  9. Mesa 10.4 Tentatively Planned For Early December
  10. SteamOS Update 145 Brings Compositor, Update Fixes
Latest Forum Discussions
  1. Linux hacker compares Solaris kernel code:
  2. Advertisements On Phoronix
  3. HOPE: The Ease Of Python With The Speed Of C++
  4. Updated and Optimized Ubuntu Free Graphics Drivers
  5. Users/Developers Threatening Fork Of Debian GNU/Linux
  6. Ubuntu 16.04 Might Be The Distribution's Last 32-Bit Release
  7. AMD Releases UVD Video Decode Support For R600 GPUs
  8. Proof that strlcpy is un-needed