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Prime Cooler CoolPad

Michael Larabel

Published on 16 June 2005
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 3 - Comment On This Article

With the sheer number of cooling products we look at all the time on Phoronix, a majority of these are either VPU, RAM, or CPU heatsinks. However, cooling manufacturers can't forget about us laptop users, as Athlon 64 or Pentium 4 laptops can generate a fair amount of heat, which isn't sustainable for our laps. Furthermore, the buildup of heat isn't good for the laptop itself. In this review, we're investigating one of the many contraptions currently available on the market that are designed for dropping your laptop temperatures cheaply and safely; this product is the Prime Cooler CoolPad.

Features:

Fan Dimensions: 60 x 60 x 12mm
Bearing Type: Sleeve Bearing
Heatsink Dimensions: 300 x 250 x 28 mm
Max Airflow: 14 CFM
Heatsink Material: Aluminum Extrusion
Fan Speed: 2000 RPM +-10%
Rated Voltage: 5V DC
Weight: 1180 g
Started Voltage: 4V DC
Noise: 17 dB(A)
Rated Current: 0.11A +-10%
Power Input: 1.21 W

Contents:

Receiving this container from the Czech Republic, as Prime Cooler is currently lacking US distributors, it was a bit battered by the time it arrived here in the United States. Upon opening this rather large cardboard packaging, we found everything to be well packaged and each component was housed individually in plastic. Found inside was simply a short USB cable, for powering the two fans, and the large CoolPad.

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