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Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Logisys Ergonomic Cool Fan Mouse & M-Coupe Optical Mouse

Michael Larabel

Published on 19 May 2005
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 2 of 3 - Comment On This Article

Examination:

First up for examination today we'll be checking out the Logisys Cool Fan Mouse. This mouse is quite different from what we have seen in other mice. The physical design for the Cool Fan Mouse is relatively close to that of a traditional 3-button mouse, but with the key difference being the implementation of a cooling fan. Cooling the palm of your hand is the main purpose for the fan, to prevent a build up of sweat when gaming for extended periods of time. This mouse is available in silver, red, and blue; with the silver model being our product sample today. The different models are identical except for the two-tone color. On the lower half are an assortment of small holes for allowing the air to pass through the fan. Unlike popular Logitech, Razer, and even Microsoft mice, the Logisys mouse conforms to a standard 3-button design. In addition, we found the scroll-wheel to be unusually wide compared to other mice; the two additional buttons on the other hand were of regular size. On the right hand side of the mouse, is a small switch for turning the fan on or off.


On the sides of the mouse are the intakes for the mouse fan. Flipping the mouse over reveals an interesting, unconventional design. As the cooling fan takes up a majority of the mouse, the optical sensor is pushed towards the front of the mouse and is rotated 90 degrees. Unlike the previously reviewed MonsterGecko Pistol Mouse FPS, the turning radius for the Logisys Cool Fan Mouse isn't altered as much due to a much smaller change in the location of the optical sensor. Protruding from the top of the mouse is a 6-foot long USB mouse cable, accompanied by a USB to PS/2 adapter.

Unlike any other mouse we've previously seen, the Logisys M-Coupe is quite radical from the standard mice we're used too. This mouse is in the shape of a Mini Coupe luxury vehicle. This car mouse is available in silver, black, red, yellow, and blue - with the black model being our test sample today. Right from the get go it was very evident as to the fine car details used by Logisys for this mouse. Two LEDs are placed at the front of the mouse, to act as "headlights" for the Coupe. In addition, when the mouse is in the process of moving, the tail/stop lights on the vehicle illuminate. For further attention to detail, four miniscule tinted windows are also placed in their respective locations on the mouse. Back onto the actual mouse features, we see three buttons are also implemented on the M-Coupe mouse. However, the buttons and scroll wheel are incredibly small. On the sides of the mouse are some chrome details to represent the wheels on the Coupe.


Taking a closer look at the underside of the M-Coupe black optical mouse, we found four incredibly small feet, which should unfortunately wear out in no time at all. Luckily though, the optical sensor was in the relative location to that of other "standard" mice, unlike the Logisys Cool Fan Mouse. Overall, both mice are quite different and unique in their own ways. With our usual golf ball size comparison, the M-Coupe is significantly smaller than that of the Cool Fan. From the overall size, size of the buttons, and the appearance of the mouse, it's quite apparent the mouse is designed for little kids just beginning to use the computer.


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