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Phoronix Test Suite

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Antec TruePower 2.0 430W

Michael Larabel

Published on 28 April 2005
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 2 of 3 - Comment On This Article

Examination:

After examining this PSU assiduously, we were quite pleased with our findings. Similar to the Seasonic S12 and some other recent PSUs, the Antec TruePower 2.0 features a fanless grill at the rear end. Also on the rear of the power supply, are a power connection, power switch, and 115/230V switch. The TruePower uses no fan speed dial or switches. On the bottom of the PSU, which faces the actual computer components, Antec has placed a 120mm Antec fan with a gold colored fan grill.


Accompanying the TruePower 2.0 430W are a fair amount of connectors. Distributed across several strands of cables are 14 connectors. These connectors consist of one 20-pin power, one 6-pin AUX, 4-pin +12V, five 4-pin molex, two 4-pin floppy, two PCI Express graphics connectors, and two SATA power connectors. Also used by the Antec TruePower 2.0 is a 3-pin fan signal connector to monitor the PSU fan speed. With the TruePower 430W, two of the 4-pin molex connectors are FAN ONLY connectors, which are used to strictly power computer cooling fans and no other peripherals as they adjust the supplied voltage to regulate the fan speed and noise levels. The main ATX power switch is a 20-pin connector with an attachable 4-pin connector for motherboards that require the extra power. We first saw this 20/24-pin connector used last year with ePower Technology and since that point have seen a number of additional vendors begin to use this type of connector. Unfortunately, the only sleeved cable is the main 20-pin connector, the rest are simply tied into the traditional unmanaged bunch. The lengths of all these cables were very reasonable with strands from 16 to 39” in length.


Opening up the power supply, we found the innards of this beast well laid out. Surprisingly, we were quite surprised at the small size of the two aluminum heatsinks, anticipating something much larger than what we had actually seen.

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