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Speeze CopperSnake III

Michael Larabel

Published on 8 April 2005
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 2 - Comment On This Article

When we last took a look at the offerings presented by Speeze, we were testing out the Speeze EEA67B4 VultureSpin 3, although this scrawny cooler wasn't able to out perform its competition, it was affordable and a breeze to install. What we have to look at today is the Speeze EE475B13 CopperSnake III, which is designed for Pentium 4's and Celeron D processors. Will the CopperSnake be able to bring anything new to the Socket 478 arena?

Features:

Heatsink Dimensions:95.5 x 83.6 x 45 mm
Bearing:Ball Bearing
Rated Speed:2300 RPM +/-10%
Rated Power:1.56 W
Noise Level:19.0 dBA
Air Flow:25.78 @ 2,300 RPM
Thermal Resistance:0.34 °C/W
Application:· Celeron ~ 2.8 GHz (FC-PGA2)
· Celeron D ~ 2.8 GHz 345
· Pentium 4 ~ 3.6 GHz (Prescott)
· Pentium 4 ~ 3.4 GHz (Willamette / HT NW)

Contents:

Like most of the products from Speeze, the CopperSnake III comes well packaged in a cardboard box and includes all of the necessary hardware for mounting the heatsink. The hardware includes two mounting clips for latching onto an existing Socket 478 retention frame, a syringe of thermal paste, an instruction sheet, and a Speeze case badge.

Examination:

Moving onto the actual cooler, we have the inverted spider-fan atop the heatsink. This fan happens to be the same exact fan found on the previously reviewed VultureSpin 3, which is able to push 25CFM @ 19.0 dBA. A nice feature about this fan is that the 3-pin power wire is sleeved in a white material for an added appearance bonus and protection against the wires from being lacerated by the 2300RPM fan. For results that are more desirable, any other 80mm fan with standard mounting holes can easily replace this fan. Upon a size comparison of the VultureSpin and CopperSnake, we found the CopperSnake to be substantially larger than the bantam EEA67B4. Tilting the unit on its side, we see 40 aluminum fins to assist in the thermal dissipation process. With stamped fin technology, all of these fins were neatly aligned with no inconsistencies between the fins. On the bottom of the unit, is the copper base with what appears to be tin-plated. Unfortunately, the finish on the base is nowhere close to the best we've seen, with more scratches than we're used to seeing on nice flat and reflective surfaces.


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