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Thermaltake Soprano Middle Tower

Michael Larabel

Published on 26 February 2005
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 3 - Comment On This Article

Thermaltake offers a vast variety of products and it seems that new items are added every few weeks. Over the past few weeks, one of the new items to catch our attention from Thermaltake has been their Soprano computer case, as it appears to have inherited some of the winning traits from previous Thermaltake cases. Will the Soprano case be the new item to take center stage, similar to Xaser series over the past couple of years? We will give our opinions on this new case, when we look at it in this review!

Features:

Case Type: Middle Tower
Dimensions: 495 x 210 x 478 mm (H x W x D)
Cooling:2 x 120mm (1400rpm, 21dBA) & 1 x 90mm (1800rpm, 21dBA)
Material: 0.8 mm SECC & Plastic (Front Bezel)
Drive Bays:4 x 5.25" & 2 x 3.5" (external) & 5 x 3.5" (internal)
Expansion Slots:7
Supported Motherboards: Micro ATX (9.6''x 9.6'') & ATX (12'' x 9.6'')

· High Efficient ventilation: Dual 12cm silent fan in front & rear, 9cm fan on side panel
· Tool-Free when installing 5.25" & 3.5" device
· Transparent X type side panel window
· Dual USB 2.0, IEEE 1394 Firewire, Audio & Speaker ports
· Retractable foot stand
· Highly flexible "Silent Purepower supply" unit supports PS/II for PC case (optional)

Contents:

Found inside the Thermaltake Soprano package was the following:

· Soprano Case
· User's Manual
· Dust Cloth
· 2 x Large Thumb Screws
· Bag of accessories
· Keys for window door & front panel
· 2 x 3.5" FDD tool free locks
· 5 x 3.5" HDD tool free locks
· 4 x 5.25" drive rails

The dust cloth was a nice accessory to accompany the case, its usefulness may be a different story, but it can easily wipe off fingerprints and smudges on the case or window. Covered inside the user's manual was such information as how to open the side panel, how to install devices in the drive bay, etc... Thermaltake placed a plastic handle on the top of the cardboard packaging, which makes transportation a breeze.

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