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CaseBuy USB Vacuum Cleaner

Michael Larabel

Published on 10 January 2005
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 2 - Add A Comment

In the past couple of years we have seen a greater number of devices begin to use USB ports, not only because of the fast transfer rates but also because of the +5V rails. When the USB specifications were developed, it was decided to combine the power and data lines into a single cable to cut the use of having to attach extra power adapters, but also to assist the users that are continually on the road and are looking for the simplicity of USB. Some of the rather odd devices we have seen in the past include an USB coffee warmer, blanket warmer, noodle-strainer, and even a USB shaver. Who would want to cook pasta and shave in front of their computer is beyond us. Today, we got our hands on a device that uses a USB device for power. We'll have to see if it holds more functionality than a noodle-strainer. This device is the USB Vacuum Cleaner from CaseBuy.

Features:

USB powered, no external power source required
Simply plug-in to connect the vacuum cleaner
Light & motor ON/OFF switch
Easy clean Dust Housing
2 vacuum cleaning attachments included: Bristle brush, Keyboard tool
Built in light allows you to clearly focus on the vacuuming area
Two power settings: high or low
Size: 10.5 x 13.5 x 3.5 cm
Weight: 69 grams

Contents:

Through the clear plastic packaging, we found only two parts; the actual vacuum cleaner with a plastic head attachment already mounted and a brush and suction head attachment. The brush and suction attachment has three smaller intakes and is surrounded by bristles to help clean your keyboard or monitor.

Examination:

The first thing we noticed about the CaseBuy USB Vacuum Cleaner was its size. When disassembling the unit, we were left with three main components to the vacuum that each amount to the size of a golf ball. There is the option for the head, with two different attachments included, the middle portion of the cleaner that serves as storage where all the dirt and debris is stored until emptied, and finally the actual vacuum with an air filter to prevent the motor from being clogged.

Around the entire vacuum are air vents and located next to them is the built-in light. This little light is designed to assist in lighting the area in which you are cleaning. Behind this light is the "High Power" button. This button increases the suction power of the vacuum and only should be pressed when the vacuum is running. On the top side of the vacuum is a switch with three options - off, light, and light with vacuum.

At the end of the unit is the USB cord that can extend to about a meter when stretched. Overall, the CaseBuy USB Vacuum appears to be designed well. Now it's time to see if it actually holds the power to provide a suitable amount of suction.

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