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Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Prime Cooler Hypercool III+ & Hypercool 4+

Michael Larabel

Published on 7 January 2005
Written by Michael Larabel
Page 1 of 3 - Comment On This Article

Ever since Zalman had released their line of radial heatsinks that broke away from the traditional heatsink design, other manufacturers have been trying to follow in the success. Prime Cooler recently presented our staff at Phoronix with an opportunity to examine two heatsinks that resemble the original Zalman radial heatsinks. However, there are a few differences, which should lead to some interesting results. Today we have the opportunity to examine Prime Cooler's Hypercool III+ and 4+.

Features:

  Hypercool III+ Hypercool 4+
Dimensions: 144 x 144 x 65 (mm) 144 x 144 x 65 (mm)
Weight: 645g 700g
Bearing Type: Dual ball Dual ball
Rated Current: 0.25Amp 0.30Amp
Airflow: 53.5 - 78.5CFM 53.5 - 78.5CFM
Fan Speed: 1200 - 2500RPM 1200 - 2200RPM
Fan Noise: 15 - 30dB 15 - 25dB

Compatibility:
Intel Socket 478
Intel Socket T LGA775 (Hypercool 4+)
AMD Socket 754
AMD Socket A (462)

Contents:

After opening both the Prime Cooler Hypercool III+ and 4+, we found roughly the same contents in both. A few included parts are installation instructions, mounting brackets, screws, shims, thermal grease, and a speed controller. The main differences between the Hypercool III+ and 4+ in contents is that the Hypercool 4+ provides the mounting clips for attaching the heatsink to an Intel Socket T LGA775 processor. Unfortunately, a rather generic fan speed controller is included. The little speed controller which is commonly found in cooling solutions allow you to adjust the voltage going to the fan, thus changing the speed at which the fan runs to customize the noise output/air flow. The installation instructions provide detailed information on mounting the heatsink with the different sockets.

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