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Thread: The Best Features Coming With Qt 5.3

  1. #1
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    Default The Best Features Coming With Qt 5.3

    Phoronix: The Best Features Coming With Qt 5.3

    Qt 5.3 will be officially released in a few days time if all goes well and with this update to the Qt5 tool-kit comes some major new features...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTY3MDU

  2. #2
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    Performance improvements are welcome. I love Qt based software, to be sure. I really wonder how much of the performance penalty in KDE comes from Qt, vs inefficient start up code in KDE's session. I've been running both the GNome Shell and Unity shell for a while in Kubuntu trusty. They both start up much faster on a cold boot. I still prefer the KDE Plasma shell, so I'll rather wait the extra few seconds (10s total from grub to a fully logged indesktop in Unity, 18 in KDE). But this is an extremely fast system (SSD for / and /home, OC'ed Haswell i5, fast RAM). My wife's lappie, even with an SSD, takes about 30s to get a full KDE session, and I'm guessing it would be 18 to 20 for a Unity shell. Oh well. Looking forward to Unity 8, which will be Qt based. If they support integration of Dolphin for filemanagement, I'm sold

  3. #3
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    Qt is very lightweight.
    LXDE is switching to qt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mendieta View Post
    Performance improvements are welcome. I love Qt based software, to be sure. I really wonder how much of the performance penalty in KDE comes from Qt, vs inefficient start up code in KDE's session. I've been running both the GNome Shell and Unity shell for a while in Kubuntu trusty. They both start up much faster on a cold boot. I still prefer the KDE Plasma shell, so I'll rather wait the extra few seconds (10s total from grub to a fully logged indesktop in Unity, 18 in KDE). But this is an extremely fast system (SSD for / and /home, OC'ed Haswell i5, fast RAM). My wife's lappie, even with an SSD, takes about 30s to get a full KDE session, and I'm guessing it would be 18 to 20 for a Unity shell. Oh well. Looking forward to Unity 8, which will be Qt based. If they support integration of Dolphin for filemanagement, I'm sold
    well i believe your kubuntu have something wrong because my arch system cool boot to KDE 4.13 in 20 seconds using an 5400RPM laptop mechanical HDD(until my new SSD arrives) including libreoffice preload and networkmanager on WiFi and cairo dock autostart.

    dunno maybe systemd + latest glibc make the difference

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrch2k8 View Post
    well i believe your kubuntu have something wrong because my arch system cool boot to KDE 4.13 in 20 seconds using an 5400RPM laptop mechanical HDD(until my new SSD arrives) including libreoffice preload and networkmanager on WiFi and cairo dock autostart.

    dunno maybe systemd + latest glibc make the difference
    Arch leaves any ubuntu variant in the dust. I don't use a SSD either and was surprised that he was talking about 20 second boot times. Boot times also depend a lot on the motherboard bios. Older bios seem to be clunky with boot times. I'm noticing the newer UEFI boot system have gained some big improvements in that area. I am sure I was achieving 20 sec boot times even on arch i686 which is not even a x64 binary. I'm talking about a cpu from 2001 which is barely even considered a desktop these days. Lets see a desktop that boots in 1 second, then I'll be impressed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by b15hop View Post
    Arch leaves any ubuntu variant in the dust. I don't use a SSD either and was surprised that he was talking about 20 second boot times. Boot times also depend a lot on the motherboard bios. Older bios seem to be clunky with boot times. I'm noticing the newer UEFI boot system have gained some big improvements in that area. I am sure I was achieving 20 sec boot times even on arch i686 which is not even a x64 binary. I'm talking about a cpu from 2001 which is barely even considered a desktop these days. Lets see a desktop that boots in 1 second, then I'll be impressed.
    UEFI with graphics turned off
    Grub with no time allowed for boot menu
    No initramfs
    All partitions on an ssd
    Fast CPU
    Gnome Shell / Unity / Enlightenment desktop environment

    Can't guarantee 1 seconds, but should be less than 5seconds.

  7. #7
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    Folks, FWIW: my desktop is not particularly optimized. It has been running ubuntu, and continuously upgrade, for many years, perhaps 9. My home directory is the same as it was back in 2000, using redhat. So I'm sure i have init services i don't need, and crap like that. I don't care that much, though faster bootup is always good.

    Anyways, it boots to lightdm in about 8 secs (measured with a script). The same script runs a konsole in the Autostart for the user who is auto logged in, and closes it, and after all of that it compares the time with the boot start time. In the case of KDE, the bootup is about 8 seconds and 10 more to complete the KDE init. Both Gnome Shell and Unity get up and running in about 2 secs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mendieta View Post
    Folks, FWIW: my desktop is not particularly optimized. It has been running ubuntu, and continuously upgrade, for many years, perhaps 9. My home directory is the same as it was back in 2000, using redhat. So I'm sure i have init services i don't need, and crap like that. I don't care that much, though faster bootup is always good.

    Anyways, it boots to lightdm in about 8 secs (measured with a script). The same script runs a konsole in the Autostart for the user who is auto logged in, and closes it, and after all of that it compares the time with the boot start time. In the case of KDE, the bootup is about 8 seconds and 10 more to complete the KDE init. Both Gnome Shell and Unity get up and running in about 2 secs.
    Not sure how Unity and Gnome Shell do it, but KDE uses a custom bash / sh script to set the environment and then start all KDE services and then bring it all together... This is supposed to soon be replaced by a systemd .service file on all systemd systems, thankfully. The script is probably a large portion of the slowdown, once it goes away those 10 seconds SHOULD be reduced.

  9. #9
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    Default KDE

    On KDE, from what I understand, if you go into system settings, session management, and change the on login to Start with empty session, you should see KDE load faster.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mendieta View Post
    I've been running both the GNome Shell and Unity shell for a while in Kubuntu trusty. They both start up much faster on a cold boot.
    I can't be arsed to look up the reference, but... it has nothing to do with "bloat" or any such thing. KDE's startup script and kdeinit4 have explicit (but necessary) delays in them to avoid various race conditions during startup -- this is expected to be fixed once KDE starts using systemd "user" sessions for its startup needs.

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