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Thread: Gigabyte AM1M-S2H

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Gigabyte AM1M-S2H

    Phoronix: Gigabyte AM1M-S2H

    The Gigabyte AM1M-S2H motherboard is an AMD AM1/FS1b motherboard that's sized for micro-ATX enclosures, offers a fine set of budget features, and costs just over $30 USD.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=20238

  2. #2
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    Wow these components are priced incredibly low, for ~$100 USD you can make a decent HTPC.

  3. #3
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    in front of my box :p
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    There is a selection of these mainboards around now, also Biostar has some, ASRock and so on. Most of them are in the 30 - 50 Euro price range. It actually would be a bargain if...

    There is though the usual limitations of the LM_Sensors / hwmon kernel drivers not finding any of the motherboard's hardware sensors
    Well, this is the reason why I am curious what chip exactly it is. Michael, you have physical access to all these boards. You could name them. Because vendors often forget to name them. In this review you just wrote "ITE" chip, but ITE makes a lot of chips. Some are well supported, others are not supported at all.
    Actually it doesn't have to be the fault of lm_sensors / kernel. Sometimes it seems impossible to find a data sheet for certain chips. So this would be then a little bit like Broadcom WLAN chip in a laptop. Just a useless brick. No docs, no driver. And in this case it is soldered and you can't exchange it.

  4. #4
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    Jun 2013
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    Memory
    - 2 x 1.5V DDR3 DIMMs
    - 32MB Maximum Memory Capacity
    - Support For DDR3-1600/1333MHz memory
    - Support for Extreme Memory Profiles (XMP)
    32MB memory capacity, is slightly less than what I'd like on my system.
    Also, is it even possible to get less than 1GB DDR3 modules?
    :P

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adarion View Post
    So this would be then a little bit like Broadcom WLAN chip in a laptop. Just a useless brick. No docs, no driver. And in this case it is soldered and you can't exchange it.
    That's not entirely true. (uploading this post using a broadcom wlan chip)

  6. #6

    Default Wrong photo

    I believe the last photo (page 3) is a different motherboard.
    For example the PCI-Express slots are missing.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by peppercats View Post
    Wow these components are priced incredibly low, for ~$100 USD you can make a decent HTPC.
    Socket FM2/FM2+ is a better choice. Better performance, Overclocking, Moderate gaming, Dual channel ram.
    And you can underclock/undervolt to 45W mabye less and keep a lot of the performance.

    But if it all boils down to Watts and you aren't going to be gaming on it much Kabini would make an awesome near silent media box that could play a lot of older titles. Be sure to get the fastest ram possible cause you only have one channel.

  8. #8

    Default VGA and PS/2

    I can't believe that these ports are still being included.

    Why not a DVI port and two more USB ports? Its been a decade since I've even seen a PS/2 mouse in any store, and VGA is just this legacy cruft that can be axed and nobody would miss it.

    (total, 1 HDMI, 1 DVI, 6 USB)

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by grndzro View Post
    Socket FM2/FM2+ is a better choice. Better performance, Overclocking, Moderate gaming, Dual channel ram.
    And you can underclock/undervolt to 45W mabye less and keep a lot of the performance.
    And you don't need any of that for an HTPC. I get the impression socket AM1 is designed to compete against the ARM HTPCs. It costs roughly the same and offers roughly the same performance, but offers a lot more bonus features (like more SATA ports, more USB 3.0 ports, PCIe slots, more OSes to choose from, etc), while sacrificing physical size and power consumption. I think this is a nice tradeoff, because it isn't a direct competition to the ARM HTPCs, it's a distinct variation.

    @halfmanhalfamazing
    Well, it does have USB headers on-board. I do think its weird to include PS/2 but it probably didn't cost anything to add it. I still use PS/2 whenever I have the opportunity - might as well if I've got the devices and the ports for it.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    33

    Default Agreed

    Quote Originally Posted by Adarion View Post
    There is a selection of these mainboards around now, also Biostar has some, ASRock and so on. Most of them are in the 30 - 50 Euro price range. It actually would be a bargain if...

    Well, this is the reason why I am curious what chip exactly it is. Michael, you have physical access to all these boards. You could name them. Because vendors often forget to name them. In this review you just wrote "ITE" chip, but ITE makes a lot of chips. Some are well supported, others are not supported at all.
    Actually it doesn't have to be the fault of lm_sensors / kernel. Sometimes it seems impossible to find a data sheet for certain chips. So this would be then a little bit like Broadcom WLAN chip in a laptop. Just a useless brick. No docs, no driver. And in this case it is soldered and you can't exchange it.
    The capture of the output from "sensors-detect", even in it's "short form" that avoids "poking sensitive chips" on certain video cards & chipsets, would provide some insight into this unknown ITE chip.

    The "sensors-detect" method is easier and less likely to void product warranties, assuming Michael bought the board rather than it being a "review sample", than asking Michael to peel off the heatsink that hides the ITE super I/O chip.

    Now that comment begs another question: "Why does a super I/O chip even need a heat sink when most if not all boards that I have seen in recent memory lack such items on those same types of chips?" The circuit diagram in the more densely illustrated and commented online PDF manual does not hint at any extra functions in this chip.

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