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Thread: Debian To Maintain 6.0 Squeeze As An LTS Release

  1. #11
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    One can buy new AMD AM1 hardware XP is supported, but it is not supported by Microsoft anymore . So it is not even legacy. it is not supported by company who made it .

    As of installers, you can use original installers for Firefox, Blender, etc. they work similar to Windows. There are some Linux distributions who can make it that ease way, or games can be packaged for click and run way, for example:

    http://www.portablelinuxgames.org/


    Quote Originally Posted by TheOne View Post
    So in other words people can still run windows XP most of the time with latest versions of favorite open source applications with little effort, with optimized drivers (unless they buy new hardware).
    I can run Debian Sarge with Xfree86 server and fglrx on my Athlon 2200 and Radeon 9250, RTCW will work but laggy as fglrx is ever been . Support ended just like for Window XP, but who cares.. so if do it, that will just for the fun or if i feel boring . So maybe i will try unsupported Windows XP on Athlon 5350 - AMD actually advertised that it is supported, which is cool of course but i don't care
    Last edited by dungeon; 04-18-2014 at 01:36 PM.

  2. #12

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    With x86/AMD64 limited support, it is clearly focused on servers. Also, with RHEL using similar packages versions (think kernel and some other low-level packages), it's not as time-consuming as maintain only by volunteers.

    I'm not sure how loud were entities demanding extended support for squeeze, as upgrading to wheezy is really easy, if you don't mess with packages version and custom repos. Upping to Jessie will be a real challenge with systemd kicking in (and his various regressions, like journald compared to good old rsyslog).

  3. #13
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    This was obvious, since the International Space Station use Debian 6.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheOne View Post
    Instead of focusing on packaging newer-software, missing-software, fixing bugs, as improving the whole system experience, package developers have to back-port security patches to support companies running old distro versions with old software, companies which may not even donate to the project to support it. Some of this packagers donate their free time, so instead of shaping the future of the OS they are shaping the past, which I see as a waste of time.

    Maybe a semi rolling release model would end all that lost time supporting older releases as doing new distro releases. Also end users would not have to spend so much time doing full system upgrades as salivating for new features on newer software version which they only can obtain by compiling or doing a full system upgrade.
    That's a good point. Backporting efforts do not typically help in terms of overall technological progress (at least not in a direct sense, anyway). However, not everything should be done in the name of forward technological advancement. Effort should be invested in making things practically useful as well, or else the effort invested in research and theory is just as wasteful.

    Backporting security fixes so that users who cannot for various reasons keep up with the newest releases of software they use are enabled to make use of stable versions of software for longer periods, in my opinion, qualifies as an example of effort invested in making things practically useful. If we are to believe DreamHost's explanation of why they moved to Ubuntu LTS, it is impossible for them to run their business profitably if they have to replace the operating system on all of the servers they maintain every two years. In that case, it is not a question of DreamHost being greedy and unwilling to invest the money necessary to do their part as good open source citizens, as apparently that level of investment would make their business impossible to sustain. That they are able to build a business around using open source software is, in my opinion, still contributing to overall technological progress, just not directly.
    Last edited by Serge; 04-18-2014 at 05:59 PM.

  5. #15
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    So in other words people can still run windows XP most of the time with latest versions of favorite open source applications with little effort, with optimized drivers (unless they buy new hardware).
    I am a big critic of the linux graphics stack and yet it is better in many ways to the pre-vista stack in Windows. The responsiveness of the stacking WM in Windows in awful. The reason people use XP is the applications. The applications on Windows are always superior, even the ones that have Linux versions.

  6. #16
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    It's Debian's own fault for putting out such a stable and robust operating system.

    You put out something like that and various organisations (corporations, governments, universities, etc.) will take interest and start using it, and for them ~3 years security support isn't enough. 5 years is like, minimum.

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