Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 43

Thread: Chromium Browser Going Through Growing Pains In Ubuntu 14.04

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    68

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GraysonPeddie View Post
    All I use is Google Chrome. It has built-in support for Flash, as not all YouTube videos, let alone PBS.org, support the playback of HTML5 video.

    Maybe one day I will if 100% of all the websites involving videos take advantage of HTML5.
    About YouTube and HTML5 videos I think something is changing. Today I launched my Chrome and the tabs with YouTube videos all loaded in HTML5 while before today those videos were all in Flash.

    Also it looks like the YouTube HTML5 player can now display advertisements so I think that's way the videos loaded in HTML5 insted of Flash.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    96

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by movieman View Post
    Isn't Chromium just Chrome with that stuff removed?
    Chrome is just a build of Chromium with a different icon and some code to report the install location if it wasn't downloaded from Google. Chromium has no spying or mandatory data reporting to Google, although it does have optional features like auto-suggestion and phishing/malware protection talking to Google servers, just like Firefox.

    Pepper flash is at v13 instead of being stuck at 11.2, and is fully sandboxed due to being a PNaCl application. It works just fine with Chromium, as does the PDF plugin, so I don't really understand why anyone is complaining.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    3,102

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by strcat View Post
    Pepper flash is at v13 instead of being stuck at 11.2, and is fully sandboxed due to being a PNaCl application. It works just fine with Chromium, as does the PDF plugin, so I don't really understand why anyone is complaining.
    Pepper flash is not redistributable on it's own. It's good to hear there is a package with it anyway, and that they're just ignoring the legal issues since it's not like anyone is going to sue over it.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    96

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by smitty3268 View Post
    Pepper flash is not redistributable on it's own. It's good to hear there is a package with it anyway, and that they're just ignoring the legal issues since it's not like anyone is going to sue over it.
    They're not ignoring the legal issues. The package ships a script to download it dynamically, similar to how the Microsoft fonts are handled.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Linuxland
    Posts
    5,068

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by strcat View Post
    Chrome is just a build of Chromium with a different icon and some code to report the install location if it wasn't downloaded from Google. Chromium has no spying or mandatory data reporting to Google, although it does have optional features like auto-suggestion and phishing/malware protection talking to Google servers, just like Firefox.
    Having autosuggestions on by default, and in such a way that normal URLs get sent... Also, Firefox takes action so that the phishing protection cannot be used to track you as easily as in Chrom*.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    1,269

    Default

    If I had to use a chromium-based browser, I'd use Iron: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SRWare_Iron

    That said, I'd rather just use Firefox and/or Midori.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Why is everyone talking as if it is only flash and only Youtube? There are media contents on the web which are not flash. Try Apple trailers, for example. Nothing that requires media plugin will work in Chrome/Chromium. This is much more crippling than just losing NPAPI flash.

    Youtube is the least of the problem because most of the videos can be played in html5 and there is a Firefox addon that plays ALL Youtube videos in html5. In addition there are a few greassemonkey scripts to play Youtube with mplayer and a couple of stand alone Youtube players, you don't need flash at all as far as Youtube is concerned.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    2

    Default

    The one problem I have with Chrome/Chromium dropping NPAPI support is that I'll no longer be able to use Chrome with Amazon Prime Instant Video streaming. Chrome's built-in Flash plugin is incomplete, and does not contain the necessary DRM. This means that the one usable method of linking XBMC to my Amazon Prime videos (the Amazon addon that uses Chrome Launcher) will be toast. I understand their reasoning, but this really sucks.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    96

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kmod View Post
    Why is everyone talking as if it is only flash and only Youtube? There are media contents on the web which are not flash. Try Apple trailers, for example. Nothing that requires media plugin will work in Chrome/Chromium. This is much more crippling than just losing NPAPI flash.

    Youtube is the least of the problem because most of the videos can be played in html5 and there is a Firefox addon that plays ALL Youtube videos in html5. In addition there are a few greassemonkey scripts to play Youtube with mplayer and a couple of stand alone Youtube players, you don't need flash at all as far as Youtube is concerned.
    Chromium (and the proprietary Chrome build) is the *only* Linux browser with an up-to-date Flash player. Pretending that Flash is somehow being lost here is misrepresenting what is happening. The Google Talk Plugin is also already a Pepper plugin, so the major loss here is going to be Java applets.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    96

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DanL View Post
    If I had to use a chromium-based browser, I'd use Iron: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SRWare_Iron

    That said, I'd rather just use Firefox and/or Midori.
    Chromium is an open-source browser, while Iron is a closed source binary blob built from it just like Chrome. In fact, the creator of Iron admits to creating it as a way to earn advertising revenue by taking advantage of the naive media in his country. There is no 'spying' in Chromium that it turns off. It does ship with different defaults (no search suggestions, no phishing/malware protection) but these are features included in Firefox too (via the same Google services!).

    Chromium happens to be the only open-source browser on Linux with a sandboxing solution, and with a Flash player that's not only up-to-date but also sandboxed. The NPAPI Flash has full unrestricted access as your user, so any exploit allows stealing all of your login sessions, saved passwords, and anything else in your home directory. This also applies to the HTML/DOM/CSS/JS implementation in Firefox, along with all of the image/video/audio codecs - a single exploit in any of these millions of lines of code gives unrestricted access as your user. Chromium runs the renderer process for each site instance in a sandbox composed of an empty chroot, process namespace, network namespace and system call sandbox (seccomp-bpf).
    Last edited by strcat; 04-16-2014 at 05:57 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •