Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Coreboot Adds Support For The Lenovo ThinkPad T530

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    14,350

    Default Coreboot Adds Support For The Lenovo ThinkPad T530

    Phoronix: Coreboot Adds Support For The Lenovo ThinkPad T530

    The Coreboot open-source BIOS/UEFI replacement now has initial support for the Lenovo ThinkPad T530 notebook...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTY2MDE

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    280

    Default

    T440 please, and I'll give it a run.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    215

    Default

    and T430 please - it's still widely used.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    in front of my box :p
    Posts
    769

    Default

    It needs datasheets. For those pesky SuperIOs. Most other things coreboot needs normally work, especially everything from AMD since AMD is very coreboot supportive. Intel blocked it for a long time (they wanted to push their UEFI crap probably). I was so stupid to give away an older FM2 socket Asus mainboard and noticed shortly after that is was one of the perfectly well supported coreboot boards. :'-(
    But as long as vendors combine strange chips with their stuff or don't even seem to be able to tell you what is inside their laptops it's hard to be on the safe (coreboot) side.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    France
    Posts
    539

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Adarion View Post
    Intel blocked it for a long time (they wanted to push their UEFI crap probably)
    UEFI is more modern in any way compared to BIOS... Network support, easier updating, mouse support, booting on storage > 2.2 TB...

    It's only crap sometimes because it's poorly implemented by motherboard manufacturers and OEMs.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Old Europe
    Posts
    904

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MartinN View Post
    T440 please, and I'll give it a run.
    How "dangerous" is it to install Coreboot?
    I'd never try to install this on a shiny new notebook.
    I guess the chance to brick it is rather high...

    BTW, is it straightforward to go back to the stock BIOS?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Linuxland
    Posts
    4,991

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by entropy View Post
    BTW, is it straightforward to go back to the stock BIOS?
    If you didn't brick it, just a flashrom away. If you did...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Connecticut,USA
    Posts
    953

    Default

    I'd love to try Coreboot on my Lenovo SL510...wonder if it would work with this hardware

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    in front of my box :p
    Posts
    769

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Calinou View Post
    UEFI is more modern in any way compared to BIOS... Network support, easier updating, mouse support, booting on storage > 2.2 TB...
    It's only crap sometimes because it's poorly implemented by motherboard manufacturers and OEMs.
    More modern than BIOS, well yes, but that doesn't seem to be too hard to achieve. Yes, vendors mess up. But intel's reference implementation is so huge - it is defective by design. You don't need something with the size of half a Linux kernel as firmware. Furthermore in this closed, proprietary and huge software there is so much potential for bugs and security holes (involuntary or on purpose) that it is just sad to see this built in at a firmware level on most x86 based computers today.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Berlin, Germany
    Posts
    821

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Calinou View Post
    It's only crap sometimes because it's poorly implemented by motherboard manufacturers and OEMs.
    I agree with Adarion here. UEFI specification is now 2000+ pages. This is almost impossible to implement fully and correctly for anybody else but Intel (read my previous rant here).

    Unfortunately, it seems to be the direction that x86 and ARM are moving to.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •