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Thread: Linux 3.14 Isn't Going To Make It Into Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

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  1. #1
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    Default Linux 3.14 Isn't Going To Make It Into Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

    Phoronix: Linux 3.14 Isn't Going To Make It Into Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

    The Ubuntu 14.04 LTS kernel freeze is less than one week and it looks like by all indications are that the Linux 3.14 kernel will not make it for the next Ubuntu LTS release...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTY0NTc

  2. #2
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    It's a pitty, that 3.14 did not make it. I really need the 3.14 btrfs patches.

    Did it ever happen, that ubuntu was upgrading the kernel during a yy.mm.x x=service_release ?
    I thought they pack everything together for a new installer cd?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by da.haensch View Post
    It's a pitty, that 3.14 did not make it. I really need the 3.14 btrfs patches.

    Did it ever happen, that ubuntu was upgrading the kernel during a yy.mm.x x=service_release ?
    I thought they pack everything together for a new installer cd?
    The LTS dot releases where x > 1 use a backport stack from LTS+N. So 12.04.2 image used the kernel+X from 12.10, 12.04.3 from 13.04, 12.04.4 from 13.10 and the final one 12.04.5 (Aug '14) will use the stack from 14.04.

    The same scheme will be used for 14.04.x. 14.04.1 will be released roughly the same time as 12.04.5 by August or so, and will carry additional SRU's accumulated during the three months after 14.04 release.

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    I don't understand the fuzz about not using 3.14. LTS refreshes were introduced for this specific reason: to enable hardware that was introduced after the release. I think it's a good thing Ubuntu is not rushing to the latest kernel. For all I know, that could destabilize the total release if this kernel is plagued by new bugs.

  5. #5
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    Does anyone here thinks that even LTS releases see production deployment the next day after release? It will take months if not years. So there should be no big harm in using the latest kernel if it brings tangible benefits. OTOH if Cannonical are wiling to maintain backports - all power to them. But is a backport more stable than the native kernel where it's taken from?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by kobblestown View Post
    Does anyone here thinks that even LTS releases see production deployment the next day after release? It will take months if not years. So there should be no big harm in using the latest kernel if it brings tangible benefits. OTOH if Cannonical are wiling to maintain backports - all power to them. But is a backport more stable than the native kernel where it's taken from?
    I was thinking the same thing. I can't picture any serious mainaner thats willing to install a freshly delivered OS. Doesn't matter if its Linux, Windows or IOS. In our organisation there are still roughly 60.000 windows xp users, to clarify my point.

    Maybe its about SLA's with manufacturers or something, the whole timetables of bug discovery shifts when they introduce such a big change this late.

    I'll probably just download the latest mainline kernel files and do a sudodpkg -i *.deb (yes i'm that lazy... all good programmers are).

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by kobblestown View Post
    Does anyone here thinks that even LTS releases see production deployment the next day after release? It will take months if not years. So there should be no big harm in using the latest kernel if it brings tangible benefits.
    I know of at least one very large high-tech company that may start shipping Trusty on desktop as early as a month after release. I think they are very glad that 14.04 will see real regression testing and be decently stabilized _before_ actual release.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rexilion View Post
    I don't understand the fuzz about not using 3.14. LTS refreshes were introduced for this specific reason: to enable hardware that was introduced after the release. I think it's a good thing Ubuntu is not rushing to the latest kernel. For all I know, that could destabilize the total release if this kernel is plagued by new bugs.
    Theres radion powermanagment by default in 3.14 for cards that where released quite some time ago

  9. #9
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    Eventhough I really like Ubuntu, since their move to Unity it became clear to me that it wasn't the distribution that fitted my need. So I took the curve and learned Arch. Quite frankly I've been please with it for all my workstation. And I've moved my servers to Debian instead.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rexilion View Post
    I don't understand the fuzz about not using 3.14. LTS refreshes were introduced for this specific reason: to enable hardware that was introduced after the release. I think it's a good thing Ubuntu is not rushing to the latest kernel. For all I know, that could destabilize the total release if this kernel is plagued by new bugs.
    I concur. For 3.14 to be included, it would have needed to be in testing a month ago. So, Ubuntu would have needed to put a very early rc in the repos, and pray that a final kernel release would happen in time for the LTS release, and also that no major regression appeared in the testing period. It would have been, simply, crazy. Anybody following kernel bug reports in any major distribution would agree, I think.

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