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Thread: Tux3 Will Likely Soon Be Added To The Linux Kernel

  1. #1
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    Default Tux3 Will Likely Soon Be Added To The Linux Kernel

    Phoronix: Tux3 Will Likely Soon Be Added To The Linux Kernel

    The Tux3 file-system has been in development since 2008 but it looks like in the next kernel release or two we will likely see it merged into the mainline Linux kernel...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTY0NTA

  2. #2
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    Default cow...

    Isn't this filesystem supposed to have a lot of CoW features without actually being Cow? Does anyone know?

  3. #3
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    Daniel Phillips, author of Tux3 got some interesting idea, namely shardmap.

    http://lkml.org/lkml/2013/6/18/869

  4. #4
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    "hardened more than some other operating systems"
    Did you/he mean file systems?

  5. #5
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    I think we all know what those unnamed file systems he was talking about are.

  6. #6
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    I can't wait to try Tux3 when it is officially upstream! I want to run it on root

  7. #7
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    What is the purpose of this filesystem? Is it better than Ext3/4?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Szzz View Post
    What is the purpose of this filesystem? Is it better than Ext3/4?
    Tux3 is a write-anywhere, atomic commit, btree-based versioning filesystem. It is the spiritual and moral successor of Tux2, the most famous filesystem that was never released. The main purpose of Tux3 is to embody Daniel Phillips's new ideas on storage data versioning. The secondary goal is to provide a more efficient snapshotting and replication method for the Zumastor NAS project, and a tertiary goal is to be better than ZFS.
    (source: http://tux3.org/ )
    The performance results shared by Tux3 say that the performance is on-par with EXT4 and XFS, with sometimes being even faster.
    (source: http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...tem&px=MTY0NTA )

    Others might have more information.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Szzz View Post
    What is the purpose of this filesystem? Is it better than Ext3/4?
    As a high level overview, I'd say it intends to try and replace ext4 as a filesystem for general use. It tries to remain lightweight while adding many new features of modern FS's that would be tough to tack onto ext4 without a redesign. I don't think it will compete with btrfs, which has more features but is also much more heavyweight.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by smitty3268 View Post
    As a high level overview, I'd say it intends to try and replace ext4 as a filesystem for general use. It tries to remain lightweight while adding many new features of modern FS's that would be tough to tack onto ext4 without a redesign. I don't think it will compete with btrfs, which has more features but is also much more heavyweight.
    If being better than ZFS is a tertiary goal, then by extension it sounds like it would be competing with btrfs (which is a direct competitor to ZFS).

    From a practical point of view, btrfs is significant because it has COW and snapshots. If Tux3 can provide those without sacrificing performance (btrfs generally performs somewhat worse than ext4 if you use snapshots, especially for things like browsers and VMs), then it could steal a lot of btrfs' market share.

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