Quote Originally Posted by haplo602 View Post
One very simple reason: SINGLE POINT OF FAILURE !!!!

The classic Unix approach eliminates SPOFs and gives you a wide choice of tools to use. Systemd is the exact opposite (I'd call it the Microsoft way of doing things).
+1

Quote Originally Posted by haplo602 View Post
Anyway, personal experience: I installed systemd on my Gentoo box to get back consolekit functionality. I tried to use it as init system, but once it mounted my LVM devices as /dev/dm-X it was quickly reduced to just udev/logind provider.
SystemD is not a first class init in Gentoo.

Quote Originally Posted by haplo602 View Post
I don't care who is responsible for the mess (systemd devs or gentoo maintainers). Such idiocies have no place in a modern system (why the hell does LVM have a vg/lv naming option if nto for clarity ? /dev/dm-X is not clear at all).
I have 13-dm-disk.rules in udev's rules.d which does something like this:

Code:
[gebruiker@delta rules.d]$ find /dev/disk
/dev/disk
/dev/disk/by-path
/dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:10.3-usb-0:5:1.0-scsi-0:0:0:3
/dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:10.3-usb-0:5:1.0-scsi-0:0:0:2
/dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:10.3-usb-0:5:1.0-scsi-0:0:0:1
/dev/disk/by-path/pci-0000:00:10.3-usb-0:5:1.0-scsi-0:0:0:0
/dev/disk/by-uuid
/dev/disk/by-uuid/9f405c34-354a-4be4-8075-ff23bd04915e
/dev/disk/by-uuid/ac570999-667e-498c-93d1-410bf87f09be
/dev/disk/by-uuid/d2b6004b-3195-4923-a803-67cac80e7d91
/dev/disk/by-uuid/04bca290-b4c2-4af6-bbf0-3738a066f501
/dev/disk/by-uuid/ec88f772-09cc-4fd7-8220-51e8fcab8152
/dev/disk/by-uuid/bc20c5fa-8463-487f-ba81-aefa0a97f06d
/dev/disk/by-uuid/6cc7990a-8185-441a-b90d-c73a25f7d4cc
/dev/disk/by-uuid/a681d6e9-ba0b-473f-80df-5f355f155272
/dev/disk/by-id
/dev/disk/by-id/usb-_USB_2.0_Reader_1936120000D9-0:3
/dev/disk/by-id/usb-_USB_2.0_Reader_1936120000D9-0:2
/dev/disk/by-id/usb-_USB_2.0_Reader_1936120000D9-0:1
/dev/disk/by-id/usb-_USB_2.0_Reader_1936120000D9-0:0
/dev/disk/by-id/dm-uuid-LVM-Wy8pjpX6RWUI2GdTbSrc2UIMtPkUAYDkIWLSk8BehahDfcoSTbtXW8eNIZGtGq1o
/dev/disk/by-id/dm-name-main-swap
/dev/disk/by-id/dm-uuid-LVM-Wy8pjpX6RWUI2GdTbSrc2UIMtPkUAYDkWUCHMRwC2pV88D50ntqFodI6nePy8ba4
/dev/disk/by-id/dm-name-main-home
/dev/disk/by-id/dm-uuid-LVM-Wy8pjpX6RWUI2GdTbSrc2UIMtPkUAYDkk53pzq4IRrxYD114GQOBJeTvBxEVw3br
/dev/disk/by-id/dm-name-main-linux--src
/dev/disk/by-id/dm-uuid-LVM-Wy8pjpX6RWUI2GdTbSrc2UIMtPkUAYDkApMkELF1wFMhFyd2Irr1u916JXgjMhVM
/dev/disk/by-id/dm-name-main-opt
/dev/disk/by-id/dm-uuid-LVM-Wy8pjpX6RWUI2GdTbSrc2UIMtPkUAYDktIgtT0Fhft2tYl7cJmKBO5Xm6rV0efdr
/dev/disk/by-id/dm-name-main-etc
/dev/disk/by-id/dm-uuid-LVM-Wy8pjpX6RWUI2GdTbSrc2UIMtPkUAYDkaUDjXh317t3AVfLZxkmktuVw8YZYXPiZ
/dev/disk/by-id/dm-name-main-usr
/dev/disk/by-id/dm-uuid-LVM-Wy8pjpX6RWUI2GdTbSrc2UIMtPkUAYDks1awxSE20rxvSNNv8RQZY1NWLBFwfNLa
/dev/disk/by-id/dm-name-main-boot
/dev/disk/by-id/dm-uuid-LVM-Wy8pjpX6RWUI2GdTbSrc2UIMtPkUAYDkSrDfoUpX3EyLQJHQuI1GnlVc0C45Etjw
/dev/disk/by-id/dm-name-main-var
/dev/disk/by-id/ata-WDC_WD800BB-00DKA0_WD-WCAHL2411610-part1
/dev/disk/by-id/ata-WDC_WD800BB-00DKA0_WD-WCAHL2411610-part3
/dev/disk/by-id/ata-WDC_WD800BB-00DKA0_WD-WCAHL2411610-part2
/dev/disk/by-id/ata-WDC_WD800BB-00DKA0_WD-WCAHL2411610
/dev/disk/by-id/ata-PHILIPS_CDRWDVD3210_AH510308012818
And it's ./10-dm.rules which creates the /dev/dm-* nodes:

Quote Originally Posted by 10-dm.rules
# Udev rules for device-mapper devices.
#
# These rules create a DM control node in /dev/mapper directory.
# The rules also create nodes named dm-x (x is a number) in /dev
# directory and symlinks to these nodes with names given by
# the actual DM names.
Quote Originally Posted by terminal
[gebruiker@delta rules.d]$ pacman -Q -o ./13-dm-disk.rules
./13-dm-disk.rules is owned by device-mapper 2.02.105-2
[gebruiker@delta rules.d]$ pacman -Q -o ./10-dm.rules
./10-dm.rules is owned by device-mapper 2.02.105-2
In Arch, these are part of the device-mapper package. In Gentoo, these are part of the lvm2 ebuild. Inside the lvm2 tarball they are located under the udev directory.

So, it's not a systemd thing. You can probably get rid of this behaviour by emerging lvm2 without the udev useflag.