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Thread: Google Continues Pushing Its WebP Image Format

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by psychoticmeow View Post
    It even works for normal screens, because instead of displaying the image at 100% of its width you display it at 50% and let the browser scale it. The end result is pretty much the same, instead of serving a 100KB JPEG you're now serving a 60KB WebP.
    I see that Google logo works that way, it's a 538x190 png that is displayed at 50% (269x95) on their front page.

    So I tried to experiment a little with it.

    14022 bytes: original logo11w.png
    12644 bytes: lossless webp (cwebp -lossless -m 6)
    12558 bytes: zopfli optimized png (100 iterations)

    It looks like 10% improvement either way.

  2. #22
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    Dec 2012
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    So what's wrong with SVGs that people don't use those for dynamically sized icons?

    Is there another vector image format that isn't a textual, xml based bloat magnet?

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Vilnius, Lithuania
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    Quote Originally Posted by zanny View Post
    So what's wrong with SVGs that people don't use those for dynamically sized icons?
    You can't SVG-ise a photo without ending up with a raster. So for many things SVG is a good idea, but not for things that are very complex.
    There are some pretty amazing complex SVGs, but at that point it gets cheaper to just put a raster, for instance (size parity only at 2700x1800): https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dojikko2.3.svg
    Last edited by GreatEmerald; 03-24-2014 at 10:48 AM. Reason: Turn off smilies

  4. #24
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    Apr 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by psychoticmeow View Post
    They've been applying their compression to static images as a way of testing it, but I think I might ask them about it as an image format.
    I, too, I think that wrapping their prediction algorithms into an actual image format could provide some definitely interesting results.
    (Probably even better then WebP, and in the range of what top-of-the-line wavelet compressors produce).

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