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Thread: An Exploit In GNOME Shell With Systemd?

  1. #11
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    Betteridge's law of headlines.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ericg View Post
    bugs get created
    I couldn't have said it better myself. Indeed, the very existence of systemd is nothing but one huge bug.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by prodigy_ View Post
    I couldn't have said it better myself. Indeed, the very existence of systemd is nothing but one huge bug.
    And the very existence of prodigy_ is one big crusade to bring us back to the good old eighties. Back then software was simple and thus (?) bugfree. Mere mortals didn't dream of putting their sticky fingers where they didn't belong. Coders were real men with real beards.

    Sarcasm aside, you must realise that your endless snide comments and doom-and-gloom-filled rants do not make you seem like the beacon of light and reason you seem to think you are. The fact people often tell you you're wrong does not prove you right, contrary to what Hollywood would have you believe.

    Our operating systems and software stacks do change so quickly it's often frustrating for us developers, but more often than not it is for the better. Just chill and go with the flow. Give your nerves a break.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuubi View Post
    And the very existence of prodigy_ is one big crusade to bring us back to the good old eighties. Back then software was simple and thus (?) bugfree. Mere mortals didn't dream of putting their sticky fingers where they didn't belong. Coders were real men with real beards.

    Sarcasm aside, you must realise that your endless snide comments and doom-and-gloom-filled rants do not make you seem like the beacon of light and reason you seem to think you are. The fact people often tell you you're wrong does not prove you right, contrary to what Hollywood would have you believe.

    Our operating systems and software stacks do change so quickly it's often frustrating for us developers, but more often than not it is for the better. Just chill and go with the flow. Give your nerves a break.
    you know..
    everything systemd does has been done at least 10 years ago, some things are even a lot older
    it's just that for the new generation this all is new (yes, i'm the new generation too)

    problem is the flow is going off a cliff

  5. #15
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    found article why systemd is broken by design
    http://ewontfix.com/14/

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by JS987 View Post
    found article why systemd is broken by design
    http://ewontfix.com/14/
    That "article" is hilariously filled with errors, like systemd needs a reboot after an upgrade. Systemd is simply the best designed and executed init-system for Linux by a large margin, which is why distro maintainers and developers who actually knows about such things, are choosing it as their distros init-system.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by gens View Post
    you know..
    everything systemd does has been done at least 10 years ago, some things are even a lot older
    it's just that for the new generation this all is new (yes, i'm the new generation too)

    problem is the flow is going off a cliff
    Yes, systemd does a lot of stuff that has been done before. It would be weird if it didn't, as it aims to provide a well designed alternative to several existing pieces of Linux infrastructure. Seems to me systemd does not reinvent where there are good solutions already available, but isn't afraid to do so where necessary. A healthy mindset for any software project, if you ask me.

    The going off a cliff part is what many (apparently most) intelligent and accomplished Linux developers do not agree with you on. Proponents of other kernels are understandably not as enthusiastic.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JS987 View Post
    found article why systemd is broken by design
    http://ewontfix.com/14/
    you found article broken by design about systemd. here, i corrected it for you

  9. #19
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    This is unexpected... Ubuntu switching to SystemD.
    http://www.markshuttleworth.com/archives/1316
    EDIT: Looks like someone has made a thread here: http://www.phoronix.com/forums/showt...tch-to-systemd

  10. #20
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    Default Ubuntu is going to use systemd too

    well fan boys Ubuntu is changing out to systemd as well can any one say some debian TC developers have a conflict of interest

    With Bdale Garbee’s casting vote this week, the Debian technical committee finally settled the question of init for both Debian and Ubuntu in favour of systemd.

    I’d like to thank the committee for their thoughtful debate under pressure in the fishbowl; it set a high bar for analysis and experience-driven decision making since most members of the committee clearly took time to familiarise themselves with both options. I know the many people who work on Upstart appreciated the high praise for its code quality, rigorous testing and clarity of purpose expressed even by members who voted against it; from my perspective, it has been a pleasure to support the efforts of people who want to create truly great free software, and do it properly. Upstart has served Ubuntu extremely well – it gave us a great competitive advantage at a time when things became very dynamic in the kernel, it’s been very stable (it is after all the init used in both Ubuntu and RHEL 6 and has set a high standard for Canonical-lead software quality of which I am proud.

    Nevertheless, the decision is for systemd, and given that Ubuntu is quite centrally a member of the Debian family, that’s a decision we support. I will ask members of the Ubuntu community to help to implement this decision efficiently, bringing systemd into both Debian and Ubuntu safely and expeditiously. It will no doubt take time to achieve the stability and coverage that we enjoy today and in 14.04 LTS with Upstart, but I will ask the Ubuntu tech board (many of whom do not work for Canonical) to review the position and map out appropriate transition plans. We’ll certainly complete work to make the new logind work without systemd as pid 1. I expect they will want to bring systemd into Ubuntu as an option for developers as soon as it is reliably available in Debian, and as our default as soon as it offers a credible quality of service to match the existing init.

    Technologies of choice evolve, and our platform evolves both to lead (today our focus is on the cloud and on mobile, and we are quite clearly leading GNU/Linux on both fronts) and to embrace change imposed elsewhere. Init is contentious because it is required for both developers and system administrators to understand its quirks and capabilities. No wonder this was a difficult debate, the consequences for hundreds of thousands of people are very high. From my perspective the fact that good people were clearly split suggests that either option would work perfectly well. I trust the new stewards of pid 1 will take that responsibility as seriously as the Upstart team has done, and be as pleasant to work with. And… onward.
    http://www.markshuttleworth.com/archives/1316

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