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Thread: Java JDK 8 Release Candidate Finally Arrives

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by uid313 View Post
    Hope it gets packaged in the Debian and Fedora repositories soon...
    The Ruby guys all strongly suggest you use the repository Ruby to support other repository Ruby apps, but for development, you should use a non-repository install manager like rbenv.

    I think the same logic applies for Java. For development, a non-repo version makes sense. Just download the JDK binary, untar in ~/opt, and use it from there. You should only need a repository version of Java to run other apps from the repos.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by phoronix View Post
    More details on the JDK 8 Release Candidate features along with other Phoronix reader thoughts on this major and long-awaited Java update, check out this forum thread.
    wow, thanks Michael Larabel or other moderator!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by uid313 View Post
    Hope it gets packaged in the Debian and Fedora repositories soon...

    I am coding Java 6 on Android, and its not fun once you tasted C# on the .NET framework.
    Unfortunately, Java 7 isn't supported on Android, only in the very latest release 4.4 Kitkat.

    I hope Java 8 will make Java feel more modern and nicer.
    I would really like to see type interfering (the 'var' keyword in C#), and collection initializers.
    When Oracle acquired Sun and the Java IP, Oracle had made the license more restrictive which did not allow distros such as Debian and Fedora to redistribute it in their repos. That meant users have to download the Oracle Java tarball from Oracle's site and then build the package for their distro using some sort of packaging script (Debian has make-javapackage for example)

    Will they change the license to allow Linux distros to provide packages for Oracle Java in their own repos, much like Sun did allow for a time? That remains to be seen, IMO.

    Java does need modernizing and securing and this update should be a step in the right direction. If Java can then compete with C# then Oracle can have a real winner.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by uid313 View Post
    If I want to distribute my app, what CyanogenMod supports is irrelevant.

    Java 7 only works on end-user devices running Android 4.4 KitKat, which is for the time being almost none.
    Not correct. You can build your application with ANY version.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeepDayze View Post
    When Oracle acquired Sun and the Java IP, Oracle had made the license more restrictive which did not allow distros such as Debian and Fedora to redistribute it in their repos. That meant users have to download the Oracle Java tarball from Oracle's site and then build the package for their distro using some sort of packaging script (Debian has make-javapackage for example)

    Will they change the license to allow Linux distros to provide packages for Oracle Java in their own repos, much like Sun did allow for a time? That remains to be seen, IMO.

    Java does need modernizing and securing and this update should be a step in the right direction. If Java can then compete with C# then Oracle can have a real winner.
    Oracle java is actually built straight from OPENJDK, which IS free to redistribute. There is quite literally NO DIFFERENCE, except the name stamped on it, between OpenJDK1.7 and OracleJDK1.7.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by droidhacker View Post
    Oracle java is actually built straight from OPENJDK, which IS free to redistribute. There is quite literally NO DIFFERENCE, except the name stamped on it, between OpenJDK1.7 and OracleJDK1.7.
    That's not quite true. The font rendering used in Oracle JDK is not freetype as used by OpenJDK. Instead they use the proprietary T2K font library. Also most distributions ship IcedTea under the OpenJDK name which has substantial differences from Oracle JDK.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeepDayze View Post
    When Oracle acquired Sun and the Java IP, Oracle had made the license more restrictive which did not allow distros such as Debian and Fedora to redistribute it in their repos. That meant users have to download the Oracle Java tarball from Oracle's site and then build the package for their distro using some sort of packaging script (Debian has make-javapackage for example)

    Will they change the license to allow Linux distros to provide packages for Oracle Java in their own repos, much like Sun did allow for a time? That remains to be seen, IMO.

    Java does need modernizing and securing and this update should be a step in the right direction. If Java can then compete with C# then Oracle can have a real winner.
    Really? Why are we even comparing C# to Java? C# is the bastard son of Microsoft, whereas Java is legitemately open source and a free language. Sure, Sun changed their licence agreement for their binary distro, but OpenJDK can be distrubted at will. Personally I have no idea what features C# has over Java, as I generally develope cross platform solutions that work in all OS's. For webapps/etc, Java fits this bill nicely. For something like a game, C + SDL2 works great (maybe cheat a bit with C++ objects, but, hey w/e). Are there really people on this forum advocating C# over Java? As far as I know, C# is only available on Linux via Mono with is pretty bastardized.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bakgwailo View Post
    whereas Java is legitemately open source and a free language.
    Except if you try to implement your version, then Oracle will sue you even if you don't call it Java.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bakgwailo View Post
    Really? Why are we even comparing C# to Java? C# is the bastard son of Microsoft, whereas Java is legitemately open source and a free language. Sure, Sun changed their licence agreement for their binary distro, but OpenJDK can be distrubted at will.
    Sun's lawsuit against Google says otherwise. Even MS hasn't sued anyone over c# or wine yet.

    Personally I have no idea what features C# has over Java, as I generally develope cross platform solutions that work in all OS's.
    A lot. A lot lot. They really aren't even comparable right now.

    Are there really people on this forum advocating C# over Java? As far as I know, C# is only available on Linux via Mono with is pretty bastardized.
    I wouldn't advocate using it on linux. It's way ahead of Java on windows, though.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by bakgwailo View Post
    Really? Why are we even comparing C# to Java? C# is the bastard son of Microsoft, whereas Java is legitemately open source and a free language. Sure, Sun changed their licence agreement for their binary distro, but OpenJDK can be distrubted at will. Personally I have no idea what features C# has over Java, as I generally develope cross platform solutions that work in all OS's. For webapps/etc, Java fits this bill nicely. For something like a game, C + SDL2 works great (maybe cheat a bit with C++ objects, but, hey w/e). Are there really people on this forum advocating C# over Java? As far as I know, C# is only available on Linux via Mono with is pretty bastardized.
    C# is superior to Java. It is Java done right. C# is like a modern version of Java.
    It has all nice language features like collection initializers, type interference, etc.
    The .NET Framework is way better planned, designed, architectured and thought out than Java Class Library (JCL).

    C# and the .NET Framework are partly standardized in Ecma, and there are third-party cross-platform implementations such as Mono.

    Things that require dozens of lines of code in Java, can be written in a handful of lines of code in C# on .NET.

    Everything about C# and .NET Framework is better than Java.
    Lets not get into the discussion about IDE where Visual Studio blows Eclipse, IntelliJ IDEA, NetBeans and everything else out of the water.
    Not to mention the MSDN documentation which is great.

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