Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Samsung Brings OpenACC 1.0+ Support To GCC Fortran

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    14,911

    Default Samsung Brings OpenACC 1.0+ Support To GCC Fortran

    Phoronix: Samsung Brings OpenACC 1.0+ Support To GCC Fortran

    Samsung is still working towards bringing OpenACC support to GCC. We've seen Samsung developers working on OpenACC for GCC over the past several months -- along with other OpenACC initiatives out of CodeSourcery, etc -- and now there's some new OpenACC GCC Fortran patches...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTU4MjQ

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    956

    Default

    Serious Question... How much new software is written in fortran nowadays? My understanding is that it is used quite a bit in scientific computing but that part of that was due to the preexisting body of fortran work. So is it still popular as a language to write new stuff in for them?

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Luke_Wolf View Post
    Serious Question... How much new software is written in fortran nowadays? My understanding is that it is used quite a bit in scientific computing but that part of that was due to the preexisting body of fortran work. So is it still popular as a language to write new stuff in for them?
    Yes it is. However there are other languages and tools at play here including R, SciPy and NumPy and even Julia as of late.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Luke_Wolf View Post
    Serious Question... How much new software is written in fortran nowadays? My understanding is that it is used quite a bit in scientific computing but that part of that was due to the preexisting body of fortran work. So is it still popular as a language to write new stuff in for them?
    Still quite popular, often because the people who write the software are physicists and chemists don't know anything else, and partially because there are a lot of good tools and libraries out there for it. There's also the advantage that it is as fast (sometimes faster) than C for number crunching code, yet it is not as low level and error prone.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •