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Thread: OpenHardware ColorHug+ Announced

  1. #1
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    Default OpenHardware ColorHug+ Announced

    Phoronix: OpenHardware ColorHug+ Announced

    The ColorHug has been one of the more successful OpenHardware projects of recent times. The ColorHug is an open-source display colorimeter for calibrating LCD panels for accurate displays. This open-source hardware was designed by GNOME's Richard Hughes and obviously features first-rate linux support. He's now working on a new ColorHug+ device...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTU3NjU

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by phoronix View Post
    He's now working on a new ColorHug+ device...
    Apart from support for print calibration I can't find any more info on what's improved on the new device. The current device seems to be excellent value for money at 60!

  3. #3
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    The new revision should have better support for high gamut and LED screens:

    http://blogs.gnome.org/hughsie/2014/01/13/807/

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    Quote Originally Posted by devius View Post
    Apart from support for print calibration I can't find any more info on what's improved on the new device. The current device seems to be excellent value for money at 60!
    The current device is indeed excellent value for money. I bought one last year and haven't regretted it one bit, it did wonders on my HP dm1z netbook and my work monitors. It's obviously not as good as a high-end photospectrometer, but for 60 it's bloody awesome.

    The new ColorHug+ is a photospectrometer, whereas the current ColorHug is a colorimeter. The operating principle is totally different, which is also why ColorHug+ can do print calibration and the ColorHug cannot. In simplified terms, ColorHug+ does a full spectrum analysis of the incoming light and creates a correction matrix to match the spectrum to some predefined curve; ColorHug instead measures only the response of the three primary colors (RGB) and tries to "guess" the rest of the spectrum based on those (which is why you need to load a calibration matrix for your specific monitor.)

    In short, ColorHug+ is a much more accurate (and expensive) piece of hardware. It's a nice upgrade if you do any sort of non-professional color-sensitive work (e.g. making indie games, correcting photos, making presentations, or similar things.)

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackStar View Post
    The current device is indeed excellent value for money. I bought one last year and haven't regretted it one bit, it did wonders on my HP dm1z netbook and my work monitors. It's obviously not as good as a high-end photospectrometer, but for 60 it's bloody awesome.
    One thing I've never understood about these devices is how do they interact with the options on monitors. For instance, most lcd monitors have several color modes. I know I should set one and then use the device, but which one will give me better results?

    Is there any part of the software that can help me choose which settings are better for my display?

    This is one of those areas where I've tried to read up a bit and get a bit lost, because most are geared toward professionals, whereas I just want decent-as-possible colors from a sea of crappy TN displays.

  6. #6
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    Default ColorHug+ seems promising

    ColorHug+ seems promising because it is a photospectrometer so it should be able to produce some good results, I believe.
    However at that price there are probably existing, mature, proven commercial solutions out there on the market.

    I have an old ColorHug, which is a colorimeter.
    To me it was a waste of money and was worse than useless.
    After calibration the colors was worse than before the calibration.

    A colorimeter suck, they're useless without a CCMX (color calibration matrix) which needs to be generated from a photospectrometer.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by [Knuckles] View Post
    One thing I've never understood about these devices is how do they interact with the options on monitors. For instance, most lcd monitors have several color modes. I know I should set one and then use the device, but which one will give me better results?

    Is there any part of the software that can help me choose which settings are better for my display?
    Yes. I own a Huey, and i have used it with Argylcms + dispalGUI on linux.
    There are two stages, one where you can fiddle with your monitor controls to try squeeze the best of it, and the second stage where it takes measures automatically. I think one is called "calibrate" and the other "profile".

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by uid313 View Post
    ColorHug+ seems promising because it is a photospectrometer so it should be able to produce some good results, I believe.
    However at that price there are probably existing, mature, proven commercial solutions out there on the market.

    I have an old ColorHug, which is a colorimeter.
    To me it was a waste of money and was worse than useless.
    After calibration the colors was worse than before the calibration.

    A colorimeter suck, they're useless without a CCMX (color calibration matrix) which needs to be generated from a photospectrometer.
    I... don't know where to start.
    Yes there are alternatives to colorhug but NOT with both open hardware and excellent Linux integration.
    So you wanted a photospectrometer, bought a calorimeter knowing that colorimeters "suck"?

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