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Thread: A Major Music Company Now Backs Systemd In Debian

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrugiero View Post
    Nope. A customer is someone who gives something back for the service, period. If you make charity, the people you help are not customers. Paying or not paying is what makes the difference between being a customer or not. Firstly, because you will usually try to conform a customer better, because what you get is not gratification only for what you did, but a pay. If you do it just for the gratification, you can quit doing it when it stops being rewarding, and you don't need to listen anyone else. And again, nobody says opinions should be discarded outright.
    If you're working as a volunteer programmer, you're customers are the people using your software. Deal with it.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by yogi_berra View Post
    If you're working as a volunteer programmer, you're customers are the people using your software. Deal with it.
    Taking part in an open source software project as a hobby has nothing to do with work. There's no customer relationship, nor do users receive any rights outside of those described in the license. Deal with it.


    PS: "Deal with it" does not lend any weight to whatever precedes it. The phrase is completely useless in a serious discussion or debate. Deal with it.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by yogi_berra View Post
    If you're working as a volunteer programmer, you're customers are the people using your software. Deal with it.
    If I'm working as a volunteer programmer, I have no responsibility towards you. When you understand this, you'll come to the conclusion you are not my customer, and expecting to be treated like one is but some cocky self-entitlement. Being a volunteer means your will to work on it is your only motivation. What pressure would you put on the "service provider" to be heard? A real customer can take his money away, and that's how he's listened by the service provider. Like it or not, if a volunteer tells you "I will not fix this bug because I don't like working on this", you'll have to live with that. The programmer can quit and the only thing he loses is a hobby, and he might look for another project to fulfill that. You can stop using his software. And you know how will it affect the programmer? He will stop getting updates on the bug he doesn't intend to fix: profit.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuubi View Post
    PS: "Deal with it" does not lend any weight to whatever precedes it. The phrase is completely useless in a serious discussion or debate. Deal with it.
    You're on phoronix, a forum filled with batshit crazy morons with wild speculation about software and you are complaining that one person isn't taking your opinion seriously?

    Perspective, get some.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrugiero View Post
    If I'm working as a volunteer programmer, I have no responsibility towards you. When you understand this, you'll come to the conclusion you are not my customer, and expecting to be treated like one is but some cocky self-entitlement. Being a volunteer means your will to work on it is your only motivation. What pressure would you put on the "service provider" to be heard? A real customer can take his money away, and that's how he's listened by the service provider. Like it or not, if a volunteer tells you "I will not fix this bug because I don't like working on this", you'll have to live with that. The programmer can quit and the only thing he loses is a hobby, and he might look for another project to fulfill that. You can stop using his software. And you know how will it affect the programmer? He will stop getting updates on the bug he doesn't intend to fix: profit.
    If you're writing code that you expect people to use, you have a responsibility to fix it. If you don't want that responsibility but still want to subject the world to your broken code than you are just a worthless shitheal that can fuck right the hell off.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by yogi_berra View Post
    If you're writing code that you expect people to use, you have a responsibility to fix it. If you don't want that responsibility but still want to subject the world to your broken code than you are just a worthless shitheal that can fuck right the hell off.
    For shitheads like you there's an explicit mention in the GPL and in open source software in general:

    Code:
    This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
        but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
        MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
        GNU General Public License for more details.
    Even proprietary corps like Microsoft write such eulas that they aren't responsible for anything, except in very limited cases with minimal responsibility.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by yogi_berra View Post
    If you're writing code that you expect people to use, you have a responsibility to fix it. If you don't want that responsibility but still want to subject the world to your broken code than you are just a worthless shitheal that can fuck right the hell off.
    Nobody puts a gun in your head to make you run the code. Also, as already mentioned, there is the "this software is provided AS IS" clause.
    You using it: A) is not my call and B) gives me nothing, aside from self-realization, if and only if I feel better knowing my code was useful.
    Me fixing it: A) is my call, not yours and B) is not my obligation. If I post code out there, I already made a gift, I shouldn't be expected to do anything else. I'll do anything else IF I WANT TO. You know, free software programmers are not your slaves.
    Last edited by mrugiero; 01-22-2014 at 01:37 PM.

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