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Thread: Intel Graphics Driver Installer 1.0.3 For Ubuntu/Fedora

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  1. #1
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    Default Intel Graphics Driver Installer 1.0.3 For Ubuntu/Fedora

    Phoronix: Intel Graphics Driver Installer 1.0.3 For Ubuntu/Fedora

    Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has released their Intel Linux Graphics Driver Installer 1.0.3 for Ubuntu and Fedora...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTU3NTQ

  2. #2
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    Thats the BIG problem with FOSS drivers generally. Thats why Windows conquer the market share.
    Lets say that you are a regular user (you bought your notebook with Ubuntu 12.04 pre-installed for example) and you have Intel graphics.

    Then lets say that a new game released on Steam and you want to play it like the way you would on Windows. Your drivers are 2 years old and they will not update as long as you don't upgrade to a newer (not that stable) version of Ubuntu.

    Thats why I think Nvidia is the best choice.

    I have a GTX 460 on Ubuntu 12.04 and I have played TF2, Wargame European Escalation, HL2 and L4D2, maxed out settings, without problems just like I can do on Windows.

    On the other hand on my HTPC I have a Radeon 2600 PRO that lacks the performance of Windows driver and even if you forget the performance regression you get, the worst is that in most cases graphics are corrupt (flickering, shadowing problems, glitches etc)

    fglrx is not even supported any more (staying with 12.04 LTS would be necessarily for that hardware).

    So Intel graphics should try to support with one-click updates the most popular distros (Ubuntu, Fedora) if they want same quality support with Windows.
    Last edited by verde; 01-18-2014 at 09:10 AM.

  3. #3
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    I've always kinda wondered why Open Source drivers on Linux were so complicated and spread out when their Closed Source counterparts manage to do just fine (Nvidia) with a singular blob. I mean, I get that there's a lot of "use this library and the work is shared across drivers" or things like that, but is there any other reason than to reduce duplication of code?
    Things like Mesa are great and all, but this is getting insane.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daktyl198 View Post
    I've always kinda wondered why Open Source drivers on Linux were so complicated and spread out when their Closed Source counterparts manage to do just fine (Nvidia) with a singular blob. I mean, I get that there's a lot of "use this library and the work is shared across drivers" or things like that, but is there any other reason than to reduce duplication of code?
    Things like Mesa are great and all, but this is getting insane.
    Well, if the new Linux OpenGL ABI gets realized, you might get some code sharing for OpenGL libraries. Not for DDX and Kernel driver though (kernel driver could use some "code sharing" if it was a kms one, but it isn't and it's doubtful that it ever will be).

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by verde View Post
    Thats the BIG problem with FOSS drivers generally. Thats why Windows conquer the market share.
    Lets say that you are a regular user (you bought your notebook with Ubuntu 12.04 pre-installed for example) and you have Intel graphics.

    Then lets say that a new game released on Steam and you want to play it like the way you would on Windows. Your drivers are 2 years old and they will not update as long as you don't upgrade to a newer (not that stable) version of Ubuntu.

    Thats why I think Nvidia is the best choice.

    I have a GTX 460 on Ubuntu 12.04 and I have played TF2, Wargame European Escalation, HL2 and L4D2, maxed out settings, without problems just like I can do on Windows.

    On the other hand on my HTPC I have a Radeon 2600 PRO that lacks the performance of Windows driver and even if you forget the performance regression you get, the worst is that in most cases graphics are corrupt (flickering, shadowing problems, glitches etc)

    fglrx is not even supported any more (staying with 12.04 LTS would be necessarily for that hardware).

    So Intel graphics should try to support with one-click updates the most popular distros (Ubuntu, Fedora) if they want same quality support with Windows.
    It's funny, how I see all of this exactly the other way around. First off, Windows captured the PC market share at least 10 years before there even were any half decent open source drivers. They simply were there first.

    In terms of 'one click', I actually love how things work in Linux. I have a current distribution, a current Intel processor, and it all works fine. When I used Intel and AMD with binary drivers, it was good when it worked, and a nightmare otherwise. Intel, here, is trying to corporate users who need or prefer to stick to an old distribution. That's ok. But it's not like they are solving a major problem. Things are more than ok with Intel and Linux.

    By the way, among the 5 best seller laptops in Amazon as of this writing, 3 are running Linux (ChromeOS), and 2 are running Windows. It is the corporate market keeping MS alive, until they see the light, they move everything to citrix servers and distribute chromeboxes as thin terminals.

    Anyways, you should use whatever makes you happy. And so should I do. Cheers!
    Last edited by mendieta; 01-18-2014 at 11:33 AM. Reason: fixed typos

  6. #6
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    Yeah. Not being able to update individual drivers is a major bummer for me.

    I had the not so fun choice with my laptop a few years back of either running a old kernel and not having graphical fixes or updating and experiencing a power usage regression.
    I had to deal with graphic issues because I couldn't update the kernel for more than a year because of the power regression took my power time from 6 hours to 1.

    Sigh. <sarcasm> Thanks you Linus for being completely against drivers being outside the kernel. </sarcasm>

  7. #7
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    My pc has always updated oss drivers in Arch Linux .
    If I want there is a precompiled repository with git drivers too.

  8. #8
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    Errata:

    Quote Originally Posted by mendieta View Post
    When I used Intel and AMD with binary drivers, it was good when it worked, and a nightmare otherwise.
    I meant to say NVIDIA, not Intel.

  9. #9
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    Default How to revert?

    So, I took a bit of a look without installing it. When you use a ppa, you can use ppa-purge to revert changes. Can you do the same with Intel's installer? Anyone knows?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mendieta View Post
    So, I took a bit of a look without installing it. When you use a ppa, you can use ppa-purge to revert changes. Can you do the same with Intel's installer? Anyone knows?
    Note that you can uninstall their package, but it's not clear that this will revert to a vanilla graphics stack. From https://01.org/linuxgraphics/downloa...er-1.0.3-linux:
    Using the Ubuntu* Software Center (or the "apt" package manager) to uninstall the Intel® Graphics Installer for Linux* will not remove the 01.org "apt" package repository. To remove the repository, disable the repository in the Ubuntu* Software Center using steps described on the Ubuntu wiki.

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