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Thread: Phoronix Test Suite Exploring GPLv2 License

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  1. #1
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    Default Phoronix Test Suite Exploring GPLv2 License

    Phoronix: Phoronix Test Suite Exploring GPLv2 License

    We are currently exploring the option of moving the Phoronix Test Suite under a GPLv2 license...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTU2NDM

  2. #2
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    There's also EUPL if you want something with more options though I haven't seen many users.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyborg16 View Post
    There's also EUPL if you want something with more options though I haven't seen many users.
    did not know about that one, thanks.

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    Are there many outside contributions in PTS?

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    That's silly, why would you want to downgrade a license? Just because some companies like to have an option to tivoise things? Don't allow yourself to be bullied like that... Also, GPLv3 is overall better written, with internet in mind etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brosis View Post
    Or patent protection for users under paragraph 11? Say, you used some mechanism of calling or benchmarking - and you, and all your userbase are sued over patent related to this.
    You are wrong here. If the patented code was implemented by Michael, there is no protection until the patent holder distributes his code, as there was no agreement on the patent holder side to allow this license.

    Quote Originally Posted by deanjo View Post
    GPL 3 doesn't realistically prevent that either. If someone is going to obfuscate the code to hide the source it doesn't matter what license they use.
    I didn't realize until I read your post, but yeah, it becomes circular: to be (legally) able to decrypt it, you must first prove it's under the GPLv3, and if you'd be able to prove that, you wouldn't need to decrypt it to prove it was under the GPLv2 in the other case, so there's no difference.

    Quote Originally Posted by TAXI View Post
    You mean the default "GPLv2 or later" ? :P
    I can't see why companies dislike GPLv3 but like "GPLv2 or later", given that "or later" means v3...

    Anyway, we should all make small contributions to PTS now, then disallow a license change...
    I always wondered how that worked, as it's "at your option". Whose option? Distributor? End-user? It makes a difference. If the distributor can choose to only consider it GPLv2 at the moment of distribution, then it's obvious why they accept it, as it means they can choose not to follow the patents and anti-tivoisation clauses. If it's end user's, then any of those distributors are effectively giving me licenses to their patents "at my option".
    I don't really see the point on dual licenses, at least if you allow the user to pick between them under the same conditions. Just use the lowest common denominator (in how restrictive they are), as it's how it will effectively work. If I dual license something as BSD/GPLv3, all of those who are negatively affected (from their point of view, that is) will use it as BSD, and the ones who care about free software will contribute back, which would happen nonetheless with BSD only.
    A different story would be in the cases of paid licenses, or in the cases where you care, for example, what they do with the software, for example, imagine you have the following ideology: all of the public administration software should remain open, but otherwise you don't care. Then, you could license your code as BSD for non-public administration applications, and GPL for public administration uses. Although this could be said to restrict the use of the software (although in sum you could use it any way you want, it's just with a different license), infringing both licenses.
    Point is, dual licensing makes sense only (or maybe almost only, and I'm missing some cases) if you impose different conditions for the licenses to apply.
    One exception might be this, GPLv2+, as I'm not sure exactly how it works.

  7. #7
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    Not giving advantages?
    How about paragraph 5&6, that in GPL2 requires you to ship CDs with source code, not acknowledging internet as distribution medium? How about someone, who downloaded PTS from your site asks to ship CDs to China or Kazakhstan?
    Or tivoisation freedom in paragraph 3? Say, someone forks phoronix on "benchmarking device" that effectively is encrypted, so that you can't prove he is using it with his own modifications.
    Or patent protection for users under paragraph 11? Say, you used some mechanism of calling or benchmarking - and you, and all your userbase are sued over patent related to this.
    Or license withdrawal protection which makes CLA unneeded, that is present in GPL3 paragraph 2, but absent in GPL2? (keyword "irrevocable") So that a contributor can't revoke his contribution from you.

    What about incompatibility between GPL3 and GPL2, the main concern that prohibited Linux to switch to GPL3 (and it was NOT anti-tivoization)? GPL3 allows to add exceptions into section 7, that GPL2 does not allow, making GPL3 more compatible with other open source licenses.

    GPL2 is outdated, stating "We consider switching to GPL2" is like stating "We consider switching to Kernel 2.0". This has no sense, except for explicit compatibility reasons. Its a clear downgrade. IMHO.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brosis View Post
    Not giving advantages?
    How about paragraph 5&6, that in GPL2 requires you to ship CDs with source code, not acknowledging internet as distribution medium? How about someone, who downloaded PTS from your site asks to ship CDs to China or Kazakhstan?
    It does not require you to ship CD's, it requires you to have the source available in machine readable form.

    Or tivoisation freedom in paragraph 3? Say, someone forks phoronix on "benchmarking device" that effectively is encrypted, so that you can't prove he is using it with his own modifications.
    GPL 3 doesn't realistically prevent that either. If someone is going to obfuscate the code to hide the source it doesn't matter what license they use.
    Last edited by deanjo; 01-09-2014 at 09:00 AM.

  9. #9
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    How about dual-licensing? That way everyone can choose the license that best fits his needs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by amehaye View Post
    How about dual-licensing? That way everyone can choose the license that best fits his needs.
    You mean the default "GPLv2 or later" ? :P
    I can't see why companies dislike GPLv3 but like "GPLv2 or later", given that "or later" means v3...

    Anyway, we should all make small contributions to PTS now, then disallow a license change...

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