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Thread: Hope Seems Lost In Running OS X Binaries On Linux

  1. #1
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    Default Hope Seems Lost In Running OS X Binaries On Linux

    Phoronix: Hope Seems Lost In Running OS X Binaries On Linux

    In December of last year Phoronix was first to cover Project Darling, an open-source project that allows running Apple Mac OS X binaries on Linux-based systems. Sadly, the Darling Project appears to now be a memory of the past...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTU1MTc

  2. #2
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    Jun 2013
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    Running Windows or OSX binaries on Linux is half-measure for me. Is distraction from the effort to bring something native.

    I never use Wine.

  3. #3
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    Jan 2013
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    I use wine for two things

    1 - for some rare things I have to run (example: bought a used hp monitor, wanted the .icc colour profile for it, hp site didn't have the file only, the only way to get it was to run the windows driver installer which unpacked the colour profile)

    2 - VST plugins

    As for OS X binary emulation... well, I can't really think of any need or use for it. Maybe running AudioUnits? But that's a pretty specific use, not really worth developing an entire project for...

  4. #4
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    Hope lost? What hope? Is there a single user who would have a real need for OSX binary emulation? Seriously?

  5. #5
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    I'm a Linux and Mac user and I saw a lot of applications that weren't ported to Windows or Linux. In my view, this project is probably more easier to develop than the Windows emulator because Apple published source code of many programs. However, I think that Darling isn't successful because majority of PC users doesn't know too much about Mac OS X and applications dedicated for him.

    I always have wanted to avoid using Windows and Wine that is why I prefer to use native applications on two different operating systems, but it's still an interesting project.

  6. #6
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    Good, because there are already more apps in Linux then OSX so no one needs such shit

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbudny View Post
    I'm a Linux and Mac user and I saw a lot of applications that weren't ported to Windows or Linux. In my view, this project is probably more easier to develop than the Windows emulator because Apple published source code of many programs. However, I think that Darling isn't successful because majority of PC users doesn't know too much about Mac OS X and applications dedicated for him.

    I always have wanted to avoid using Windows and Wine that is why I prefer to use native applications on two different operating systems, but it's still an interesting project.
    I agree and also use OSX part time. I was really looking forward to this project. It would have been neat to beable to run windows and osx binaries in linux but of course native programs are preferred.

  8. #8
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    Oct 2011
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    "Hope is lost"

    Dude, there was a single guy hacking away at the code. Compare that to a project like Wine that gets solid financial backing which allows it to have developers working on it full-time and you see just how much hope the project had from the start.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by TemplarGR View Post
    Hope lost? What hope? Is there a single user who would have a real need for OSX binary emulation? Seriously?
    Considering how many games you find on Windows are now on Mac, plenty of users would prefer this. OSX and linux have a lot more in common than Windows does with either of them. That being said, generally speaking, we'd get better performance out of Mac software than we would with Windows.

    Otherwise, generally there aren't any Mac-exclusive programs Linux users would seriously care about using.

  10. #10
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    It'd be a real shame if this was abandoned, it would be cool if you could run a full version of Lightroom or Photoshop on Linux just by way of example.

    These kinds of compatibility layers can be very effective but often flounder getting beyond 80% or so because it becomes harder and harder to wrinkle out all the tiny little features that are used more and more rarely.

    Sometimes it seems easier to use virtualization.

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