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Thread: GStreamer Might Tackle DRM, Blu-Ray Support

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  1. #1
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    Default GStreamer Might Tackle DRM, Blu-Ray Support

    Phoronix: GStreamer Might Tackle DRM, Blu-Ray Support

    At the recent GStreamer Conference 2013 there was a presentation on "Taking Gstreamer to the Next Level" and in there some interesting features were brought up...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTUzODY

  2. #2
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    There certainly would be many Linux users interested in better Blu-ray support!

    Not interested, I'm not using blu-rays. And bringing support for DRM in Gstreamer sounds like a very controversial topic. Many won't like that garbage to be present anywhere in the system.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by shmerl View Post
    Many won't like that garbage to be present anywhere in the system.
    Then they don't have to install it, it is as simple as that.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanjo View Post
    Then they don't have to install it, it is as simple as that.
    There's more to that.
    DRM is essential for the market. The problem with DRM is the same as with greed or software patents - it's not because it exists but because it's vastly abused.

  5. #5
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    Isn't there libaacs already anyway? (https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/BluRay). It covers most of the basic needs for those who really need this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by shmerl View Post
    Isn't there libaacs already anyway? (https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/BluRay). It covers most of the basic needs for those who really need this.
    Except this doesn't include BD+, and libaacs can be interesting to get to work for newer disks.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by mark45 View Post
    There's more to that.
    DRM is essential for the market. The problem with DRM is the same as with greed or software patents - it's not because it exists but because it's vastly abused.
    Exactly, see unobtrusive DRM such as that employed by Steam or Desura vs. something like UPlay.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by deanjo View Post
    Then they don't have to install it, it is as simple as that.
    No, it's not simple as that. In order to be effective (theoretically, as practical effectiveness of DRM is all but non-existent), DRM requires modifications to the platform it runs on that need to be withstood by the whole community using that platform, not only by the users who volountarly choose to be subjugated by DRM.

    In other words, GStreamer's DRM support would find effective usage on user-restricted hardware such as phones and tablets but not on open source OSes where anyone can look at the output of any "binary blob", thereby defeating the purpose of the binary blob itself.

  9. #9
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    The only way an "open source" implementation of DRM could work would be if the actual DRM decoding would be done remotely, ie. the local open source player would send the encrypted data to a remote server, which would stream back the decrypted video. The remote server would act as the black box in this.

    Of course, you don't have to be a genius to figure out a million flaws in this idea.

    On the other hand, GStreamer developers could simply break the blu-ray encryption, and create an open source implementation that plays back DRM'd content without the DRM. That'd be fine. Commendable, even. Isn't DVD playback already pretty much done in this way anyway?

  10. #10
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    "It's always possible to use GPLed code to write software that implements DRM." -- A Quick Guide to GPLv3

    Even that, I don't think GStreamer's solution for Blu-ray will be open source. It could be in a form very similar to their DVD playback solution: commercial closed-source product with required license and patent from Blu-ray group, based on GStreamer technology.

    Still, I think it's good to have it on Linux, just as Steam.
    It's a historical burden Desktop has to carry until we reached DRM-Free world.

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