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Thread: Mesa Support Comes For Adaptive Vsync

  1. #1
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    Default Mesa Support Comes For Adaptive Vsync

    Phoronix: Mesa Support Comes For Adaptive Vsync

    Patches published for Mesa today are beginning to work on adaptive vsync support and eventually the GLX_EXT_swap_control_tear extension...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTU0NDE

  2. #2
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    Some background from Valve-Nvidia presentation http://www.gdcvault.com/play/1017850/ staring from 24:35

  3. #3
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    Looks like there are some mis-placed typo'd comments in the patch. Will wait for the merge on this one.

    That said, it'll be nice to have some better vsync awareness in Mesa. Though if you're running less than 60fps on a 60hz monitor, you shouldn't see any tearing at all anyway.

  4. #4
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    Adaptive v-sync. aka, v-sync is turned off when fps < refresh rate.

    I won't be using this. Screen tearing is way more annoying than loosing a few fps. And yes you will have screen tearing if v-sync is off and the fps is less than your refresh rate.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ua=42 View Post
    Screen tearing is way more annoying than loosing a few fps.
    30 fps is unbearable for me for a side-scroller or a rotating view Its only ok if there is little change between frames. I dislike tearing but its less of a problem for me. I think I read somewhere about some new tech where the monitor starts displaying a new frame only when the computer says it is ready, which Id love to get best of both worlds: no tearing, no FPS drop!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by stqn View Post
    30 fps is unbearable for me for a side-scroller or a rotating view Its only ok if there is little change between frames. I dislike tearing but its less of a problem for me. I think I read somewhere about some new tech where the monitor starts displaying a new frame only when the computer says it is ready, which Id love to get best of both worlds: no tearing, no FPS drop!
    It's called G-Sync and has quite a lot of issues:
    - NVIDIA-only
    - no Linux support, and even less support in Free drivers
    - needs a specific monitor which is also very expensive for now (at least $400 with an expansion kit)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by stqn View Post
    30 fps is unbearable for me for a side-scroller or a rotating view Its only ok if there is little change between frames. I dislike tearing but its less of a problem for me. I think I read somewhere about some new tech where the monitor starts displaying a new frame only when the computer says it is ready, which Id love to get best of both worlds: no tearing, no FPS drop!
    That's NVIDIA G-Sync. It's currently only available as an expensive mod to a few monitors that works only when paired with NVIDIA GPUs (and - I assume - the proprietary driver).

    Given some years this might be built-in to affordable monitors and might be available for Intel and AMD users, maybe even with the open drivers. It's not likely going to happen soon, though.

    And no, tearing is not guaranteed at under 60 FPS. It's only guaranteed when your game's FPS is not a divisor/multiple of the monitor's refresh rate. The problem is that with a 60Hz monitor, that means you need to run at >= 60 FPS, 30, 20, etc. (at which point it's unplayable). V-sync will force the game to run at one of those rates (kinda; it might actually bounce between these rates if the frame time is varying widely with each frame, which can be even more annoying than a low but steady FPS). You can get 120Hz monitors today which help a bit since the next step after 60 for those is 40 (not 30), though that's still a noticeable drop. That's a good step in the right direction until G-sync becomes easily attainable.

  8. #8

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    Can we get triple buffering support in addition? It's a better solution in most cases in my opinion, at least for games that aren't too latency sensitive (in which case I wouldn't use adaptive VSync either)

  9. #9
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    RadeonPro calls this Dynamic V-sync.

  10. #10
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    Now what we need is Dynamic Framerate Control, where you can set a maximum framerate and it will never render more than that framerate. It's useful when you use DFC with Dynamic V-Sync.

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