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Thread: Wayland's Weston Received New Features Yesterday

  1. #11
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    I'm curious. Wouldn't minimize support only require the compositor to tell the renderer, "Don't render this window for now" or "Render this window to a 30px x 30px surface"? Is there currently no way to tell Wayland to not bother rendering a target window, or to render it to a smaller surface?

  2. #12
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    Hey giucam, do you think write that plugin for a complete window manager like Fluxbox would be feasible?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ua=42 View Post
    I'm curious. Wouldn't minimize support only require the compositor to tell the renderer, "Don't render this window for now" or "Render this window to a 30px x 30px surface"? Is there currently no way to tell Wayland to not bother rendering a target window, or to render it to a smaller surface?
    That's not the point. There is no problem in doing that but when should that be done? The user expects the window to minimize when he clicks on the "_" button in the decorations. Since the decorations are client side the client gets the click and it needs to ask the compositor to minimize it. That's the missing part. Weston can perfectly minimize a window, but it cannot know when it should minimize it.

    See this video. That's a weston shell, and you can see there a window is minimized, but by clicking on the taskbar. Clicking on the "_" button in the decorations has no effect (i don't do that in the video, but trust me), because protocol is missing. Clicking on the taskbar means the compositor is getting the click event (that's false actually, but it's a special case), so it knows the user is asking to minimize that window.

    Hey giucam, do you think write that plugin for a complete window manager like Fluxbox would be feasible?
    You don't write a weston plugin for a wm, you make a wm a weston plugin. I don't know fluxbox's codebase, but that would probably require a rewrite rather than a port.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by uid313 View Post
    Awesome to see alt-tab window switching.
    Expose is nice too!

    A problem with Wayland is that it has no mouse acceleration so the mouse pointer moves really slow and is a pain in the ass to use.
    Also sucks that you cant minimize windows in Weston.

    I would really like to see window grid placement. Press WinKey+4 to place window on left side of screen, press WinKey+6 to move window to right side of screen.
    WinKey+9 for upper-right corner, etc.
    Gnome Shell, which will soon become a Wayland compositor, supports a similar feature through an extension, although using the mouse not the keyboard. Just drag a window over another window while holding Ctrl and the windows will be tiled for you. Way more powerful and usable than your suggestion in my opinion.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarmad View Post
    Gnome Shell, which will soon become a Wayland compositor, supports a similar feature through an extension, although using the mouse not the keyboard. Just drag a window over another window while holding Ctrl and the windows will be tiled for you. Way more powerful and usable than your suggestion in my opinion.
    Unless you don't want to use a mouse, that is.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarmad View Post
    Gnome Shell, which will soon become a Wayland compositor, supports a similar feature through an extension, although using the mouse not the keyboard. Just drag a window over another window while holding Ctrl and the windows will be tiled for you. Way more powerful and usable than your suggestion in my opinion.
    I don't find GNOME Shell usable though.
    I find it confusing, and its like its designed for these touch people.
    To me it just feels backwards and weird.

    I want gnome-session-flashback.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by uid313 View Post
    I don't find GNOME Shell usable though.
    I find it confusing, and its like its designed for these touch people.
    To me it just feels backwards and weird.

    I want gnome-session-flashback.
    No it's not designed for touch. It's designed for desktop computing, i.e. mouse and keyboard, and it's in fact hard to use (if at all usable) with a touch screen. It's designed to be a highly productive environment if you manage to teach yourself out of the mindset of having a traditional task bar and programs menu. It's also designed for maximum use of screen space which is perfect for laptops.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarmad View Post
    No it's not designed for touch. It's designed for desktop computing, i.e. mouse and keyboard, and it's in fact hard to use (if at all usable) with a touch screen. It's designed to be a highly productive environment if you manage to teach yourself out of the mindset of having a traditional task bar and programs menu. It's also designed for maximum use of screen space which is perfect for laptops.
    *Especially* for keyboard. It's kind of clumsy for mouse use (too much long-distance movement, reliance on the screen edges and corners), but it works *very* well for someone who tends to use the keyboard for most stuff...

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarmad View Post
    No it's not designed for touch. It's designed for desktop computing, i.e. mouse and keyboard, and it's in fact hard to use (if at all usable) with a touch screen. It's designed to be a highly productive environment if you manage to teach yourself out of the mindset of having a traditional task bar and programs menu. It's also designed for maximum use of screen space which is perfect for laptops.
    Well, it's probably good for people who only use their web browser and such.
    Moms and dads and such.

    Probably not so good for advanced users.
    I find it mostly just gets in the way...

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delgarde View Post
    *Especially* for keyboard. It's kind of clumsy for mouse use (too much long-distance movement, reliance on the screen edges and corners),.
    In case of mouse use, its pointer speed is the factor.

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