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Thread: Is All Hope Lost For Non-Android Linux Tablets?

  1. #11
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    Jan 2013
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    Default All hope is lost for Phoronix

    No, but maybe all hope is lost for Phoronix? lol. Seriously? Firefox OS will rock your pants beginning in 2015.

  2. #12
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    Jan 2011
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    Default

    There’s a </a> before the "Crowd Funding Failed" text so the link does not appear.

  3. #13
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    Jun 2012
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    29

    Arrow Who wants another tablet a dozen months in the making?

    Seriously crowdfunding is for real innovation, not for me-too products. By the time those dudes have finished their dreamers' crowdfunding campaigns the specs are already 6 months behind the - tough, fierce and real - competition. And when they're eventually ready to deliver it's almost one full year, and the pricing sucks too. And that's not counting the quality setbacks.

    Who wants another tablet? What's already on the market (be it Android or Surface) is just waiting to be tweaked for those geek enough to want more from state of the art hardware. Ok mods will not help launch the next billionnaire startup, but open-source is about bringing added-value to the user first, and then try to monetize it. Not the other way round.

  4. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mchiron View Post
    What about full windows 8 x86 tablet? You should be able to boot and install any linux distro on those.
    Something like the dell venue 8 pro or the Asus T100.
    If I can ever justify the cost of having both an OpenPandora and a tablet, I'm thinking about a Surface Pro 2. The Wacom digitizer in it doesn't sense tilt and rotation, but pressure is good enough for me and it would mean it could double as a cheaper, more portable alternative to the Wacom Cintiq 13HD (An LCD/digitizer hybrid for desktop PCs) and a more open alternative to Wacom's upcoming Cintiq Companion line of Surface-like tablets with professional digitizers.

    (I'm too lazy to learn to draw without Ctrl+Z and it's a lot easier when you're looking at the same surface you're drawing on.)

  5. #15
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    Dec 2009
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    Default

    KDE Vivaldi will be using Wayland in the future version of the Plasma Active, so it's the only interesting option out there.

  6. #16
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mchiron View Post
    What about full windows 8 x86 tablet? You should be able to boot and install any linux distro on those.
    Something like the dell venue 8 pro or the Asus T100.
    That's essentially dumping a full desktop OS on a tablet form factor much like Microsoft has done.

    The only difference is that Microsoft has a good chance of actually making it work because of Metro; it really plays well with touch operation. Having owned a Surface RT myself, I can clearly say that where touch-centric apps are concerned, Microsoft Metro apps delivers the best experience IMHO. IE11 Metro is miles ahead of the various Android browsers and iOS's Safari where ease of use and polish is concerned, and the built-in Metro Mail app is a real joy to use on touch, so much so that I sold off my Galaxy Tab 10 without missing it a bit.

    In fact, words do it no justice; one really has to use a Windows 8 / Windows 8.1 tablet on a regular basis for a month or two and it really grows on you.

  7. #17
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    Default

    Just want to add a little something (stupid 1 min edit limit):

    Add the fact Windows 8 / Windows RT also features the classic Desktop UI which means that I can connect a microHDMI cable from the Surface RT to a monitor to convert it to a basic workstation with the familiar Desktop UI, which is exactly what I'm doing now while posting this.

  8. #18
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    If a full Linux-on-tablet device is to take off I would think that it needs to adopt Microsoft's strategy of having two UIs that interact with each other seamlessly like what Metro currently does; a very touch-centric UI for when the tablet is being used as a , well, tablet, and a traditional desktop metaphor for when the device is connected to a display.

    Let's face it, the current desktop environments for Linux are all horribly inadequate for touch.

  9. #19
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    Oct 2009
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    Default

    There is a reason why Linux-as-a-desktop never really took off, which carries through with Linux-as-a-tablet: COMMERCIAL APPLICATION SUPPORT!!!

    As nice as the idea is to have a pure-linux-tablet, software developers will always put their resources into a platform that they know will provide them with the widest market. They may or may not extend support to other platforms. The second problem has to do with marketing resources; who is actually going to pay out a huge amount of CASH MONEY to sell a product that may or may not succeed, when they can put out an ANDROID tablet that they can sell with a lot less marketing?

    The fact is that for a piece of tablet hardware to succeed, it really has to support Android first, and anything else second. GNU-Linux on tablet is going to remain a niche product, and remain in the realm of being installed to existing Android tablets.


    As far as dual booting goes, that's trivial, and can be done now, with any hardware.

    Also, firefox OS is going to fail miserably. Its just a neutered version of Android.

  10. #20
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    Jan 2011
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    Default

    Ubuntu-Touch has got its qualities, but who ever set its milestones clearly didn't know what was important. Example, core applications that an operating system stands on should always reflect the company's persona, yet it was decided that the open community would produce the all main apps. It's absolutely perplexing, and has resulted in a dog's breakfast of quality, style and functionality. If the argument was Canconical didn't have the resources to in-house its own apps then it could have paid performance goals to the community, rather than allow determination to those outside the company.

    Then consider how Canonical's Art/Design team seems to have a back stage in the company. This is mystifying as smart mobile devices are so driven on gestures and hipster flair. Why isn't any of the Design-Team in senior roles dictating their teams position? Mark needs to have trust and have one of these Design members be able to carry though his wants or take hold of those not yet decided on.

    If the situation doesn't change at Canonical then Ubuntu-Touch's success will only happen in slow progression, meaning slow adoption, another struggle similar to the attempts to get the desktop to become mainstream.

    I still can't read an eBook on Ubuntu-Touch. Now installed KitKat on my Nexus 7.

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